Archive for October, 2014

QE RIP

Friday, October 31st, 2014

So the Federal Reserve Board has made it official.  This is the end of quantitative easing.  It’s quits for QE.  Bond buying has gone bye bye.  Quantitative easing has been eased out of existence, tapered into extinction.  The QE case is closed.

If nothing else, QE has provided us with material for more of our blog posts than any other topic (55, not including this one!), so, given that we’ll now need a new source of inspiration, we’re almost sorry to see it end. Fed Portfolio

So is this an obituary for the greatest (in terms of dollars involved, if not in results) experiment ever in monetary policy?  Should we hoist up the “Mission Accomplished” banner, pop the champagne cork and make a toast to Ben Bernanke and his brethren?

Not so fast.  There’s still an epilogue worth drafting.  Closure is needed.  This may be our last chance to take a shot at QE, so we’re taking advantage of it.

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Repeat After Me: The Economy Is Improving. The Economy Is Improving.

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

If you repeat something often enough, you may even start to believe it.

So try this phrase: “The economy is improving.  The economy is improving.  The economy is improving.”

Certainly, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Propaganda (aka, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis or BEA) would have you think that’s the case.  The BEA initially reported growth in gross domestic product (GDP) of 4% for the second quarter of 2014.  That seemed like quite a leap from the first quarter’s -2.9% contraction, but the BEA adjusted that number to “negative growth” of -2.1%. Household Income

That’s old news, though.  Thanks to “a larger than previously estimated increase in nonresidential fixed investment,” the BEA announced in August that second quarter growth was really 4.2%.  A swing of 6.3% in a single quarter!  Well done!

But wait … there’s more.  The BEA announced in September that second quarter growth was 4.6%!  The BEA cited “growing personal consumption, private inventory investment, exports, both residential and nonresidential fixed investment, as well as local government spending,” none of which apparently existed when the BEA gave its first two estimates.

We can hardly wait for October 30, when the BEA is scheduled to report Q3 results.  Maybe by then, we’ll learn that second quarter growth exceeded 5%.  It will be interesting to find out whether Q1’s negative growth was an aberration or whether Q2’s giant leap forward was an aberration.

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More Consideration of “Considerable”

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

Yes, we’ve already discussed the word “considerable” at considerable length, in relation to its use by the Federal Reserve Board in its recent policy statement.

But apparently we are on to something of a considerable size.  Maybe it was a slow news day, but The New York Times devoted an article to the Fed’s use of the word, noting that “Federal Reserve officials are looking for a new way to reassure investors that they are not ready to start raising interest rates.” 

Fed Chair Janet Yellen

Fed Chair Janet Yellen

Commenting on the “considerable time” reference in the policy statement, The New York Times article reported that an account of the meeting “suggests that officials are trying to find a new way to say the same thing.”

Think about that.  Unemployment remains high, inflation goals are not being met, the Fed is holding trillions in bonds it will eventually have to sell and the stock market is acting wobbly … but the Fed is looking for a “new way” to say “considerable.”

Fed Chair Janet Yellen could just say the Fed is not ready to start raising interest rates.  She could say the Fed is not planning to raise rates “for a long time,” which would be reassuring to investors.  Or members of the Federal Open Market Committee could go to an online thesaurus and come up with more than a dozen synonyms in seconds.

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Satan Is a High-Frequency Trader

Friday, October 10th, 2014

Satan is now firmly in control of the markets.

No, we’re not talking about Ben Bernanke, aka Edward Quince.  His time has passed.  We’re talking about a high-frequency trader who also happens to be hell’s CEO.

satanAs evidence, consider Thursday’s market plunge.  The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) fell 334.97 points, its largest loss of the year.  The drop took place, as Zerohedge noted, after “ ‘someone’ canceled-and-replaced orders for 666 contracts 26 times in the 1130ET to 1200ET period,” after which “selling accelerated lower, no reversal, to close at the lows on heavy volume.”

The number 666 is, of course, the winning number in hell’s lottery.  To trade 666 contracts 26 times, you need a lot of capital in your account.  Most traders would avoid using the devil’s number, but someone – or, more likely, some firm – was trying to make a statement.

What could it mean?  That Satan is in charge, of course.

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Too Much Interest in Interest Rates

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

There has been much market panic of late over the possibility that the Federal Reserve Board will be raising interest rates sometime in the not-too-distant future.

Small cap stocks were the first casualty.  As September ended, the S&P 500 was still up 7.3% for the year, while the Russell 2000 was down 3.8% and off 7.4% from its high in July.  Even after being up more than 40% year-over-year at the end of December, the Russell 2000 was negative year-over-year on Wednesday before having its best day in six weeks on Thursday. 
20141002_RTY

As The Wall Street Journal explained, “Given that periods of market turmoil tend to buffet small stocks more than their larger counterparts, many investors in small companies are fearful as the Federal Reserve moves toward raising interest rates.  Even investors hopeful for small stocks are proceeding with caution.”

But should the markets be this skittish over interest rates?

In September, Fed Chair Janet Yellen announced that interest rates will remain low for “a considerable time” even after quantitative easing (QE), the Fed’s bond-buying program, ends.  QE is scheduled to end this month, but could be extended.

Economic data continues to be mixed.  The official U-3 unemployment rate dropped to 5.9%, but the percentage of Americans participating in the workforce is at a 36 year low.  Jobs are increasing, but four out of five of them are for low or minimum wages.  So QE could be extended, since its alleged purpose is to help the economy grow.

Even if QE ends this month, the “considerable time” Ms. Yellen cites could, indeed, be considerable, given the consequences of raising interest rates.

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