Do You Like Being Told What to Do?

Listen, this whole system of yours could be on fire and I couldn’t even turn on the kitchen tap without filling out a twenty-seven B stroke six … bloody paperwork.                                                                                                                                                            Harry Tuttle in “Brazil” 

Americans didn’t used to like being told what to do.  We fought the Revolutionary War so that we wouldn’t have to take orders from England.  We fought the Civil War to end slavery and make every American free.  We fought two world wars to hold on to that freedom.

And then along came big government.  Medicare to help the old.  Medicaid to help the poor.  Food stamps and medical leave, help for the disabled and guaranteed wages, regulations to reduce pollution and prevent financial wrongdoing.  And much, much more.88468_Words-and-Actions-by-Eric-Allie-Caglecartoons-515x356

Some of it was good.  Some of it was needed.  But much of it wasn’t.  Do we really need more than 80 federal welfare programs to provide money, food, housing, medical care and social services to low-income Americans?  Wouldn’t maybe three or four be more efficient?

It’s difficult to pinpoint exactly when regulations got the better of us.  You could argue that it goes back to 1930, when the protectionist Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act helped cause the Great Depression and the New Deal made the impact worst.  You could argue that it was during the ’60s, when the Great Society programs and the War on Poverty took place.  As we (and many others) pointed out last year, during the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, after spending $20.7 trillion (based on 2011 dollars), the poverty level today is essentially unchanged at about 15% of the American population.

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Happy Dependence Day

On the fourth of July, we celebrate our freedom from tyranny. Yet King George would be envious of the control the U.S. government, and state and local governments hold over American citizens today.

Our freedom is eroding and, unless major changes are made, someday it will be gone.  If America is the “land of the free,” why are college campuses and media increasingly accepting only “progressive” viewpoints?  Diversity is a great thing, but it should go beyond race and gender to include differing points of view.SR-fed-spending-numbers-2012-p8-1-chart-8_HIGHRES

President Obama has said that he is not a king, but he has acted like one, signing a seemingly endless stream of executive orders. New laws are no longer passed by Congress, but are created by executive order (environmental regulations, dropping restrictions on Cuba) or by one-party vote (the Affordable Care Act, Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act).

And, increasingly, Americans are trading their independence for government dependence.

Consider some of the ways in which we are losing our freedom.

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Eroding Economic Freedom Means Slower Economic Growth

Being “the land of the free” apparently doesn’t apply to the American economy anymore.

Being a capitalist society with free markets, complemented by the Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution, have made America the freest country in the world with the highest standard of living.

And yet America’s standing is slipping.  The 2016 Index of Economic Freedom gives the U.S. a rating of 75.4 points out of 100—what your teacher would call a C.  That’s a drop of 0.8 points from last year, which is enough to nudge the U.S. out of the top 10.  But, heh, we’re way ahead of North Korea, Cuba and Iran.SR-trade-freedom-2016-chart-2

Ours is not an economy in shackles yet, but the degree of freedom needed to sustain rapid growth is eroding.  It was the eighth time in the past 10 years that the U.S. has lost ground. In contrast, more than half of the countries in the index—97 out of 186—improved their score this year and 32 recorded their highest level of economic freedom ever.

Hong Kong and Singapore lead the rankings with scores of 88.6 and 87.6, respectively, but the U.S. is also bested by New Zealand, Switzerland, Australia, Canada, Chile, Ireland, Estonia and the United Kingdom.

Ratings are based on 10 factors, including the size of government, regulations, degree of corruption, taxes and the openness of markets.

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