Archive for the ‘Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Category

Can We All Be Greeters at Wal-Mart?

Monday, July 11th, 2016

Job reports typically report on jobs as if they are a commodity; a job is a job, whether you’re a CEOs or a greeter at Wal-Mart.

So it’s good news that 287,000 new jobs were added to the economy in June—assuming you believe government statistics—but it’s bad news if the jobs are so mediocre, illegal immigrants wouldn’t work them. Older workers

First, let’s consider the numbers. In May, the experts predicted that 160,000 new jobs would be created, but the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that only 38,000 were created. The unemployment rate dropped to 4.7%, though, because 458,000 workers dropped out of the labor force and were no longer counted in the statistics.

For June, experts predicted that 175,000 new jobs would be created, which is 112,000 fewer than the BLS reported. At the same time, the BLS revised the May figure downward to just 11,000 new jobs. The question no one seems to be asking is why there was so much volatility between May and June. How does the economy add virtually no jobs one month and then produce 26 times as many jobs the following month? Even the stock market isn’t that volatile.

The report prompted headlines such as, “U.S. employment rebounds strongly in June, calming fears of economic slowdown” (The Washington Post), “Job growth surges in June as employers add whopping 287,000 jobs” (USA Today) and “Jobs Roar Back With Gain of 287,000 in June, Easing Worry” (The New York Times).

And, by the way, the unemployment rate increased from 4.7% to 4.9% in June, primarily because some Americans rejoined the work force.  (more…)

The Job Creation Snow Job

Monday, June 6th, 2016

Consider this headline from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: Unemployment rate declines to 4.7% in May; payroll employment changes little (+38,000).

Great news, right? The unemployment rate fell to just 4.7% in May, the lowest it’s been since before the financial crisis began.

But take a closer look.

The consensus was that the U.S. economy would create 160,000 jobs in May. That’s a pretty modest number—but not nearly as modest as the actual number. It turns out that the experts were off by about 420%. The U.S. economy created a meager 38,000 jobs in May.Employment

And, by the way, the BLS also announced that the economy created 59,000 fewer jobs in March and April than previously estimated. In other words, the BLS reported a net loss of 21,000 jobs. (more…)

Set. Down. No Hike.

Monday, March 21st, 2016

The economic outlook can be summed up in five words: Everything’s great, except what isn’t.

We’ll lead with the “everything’s great” part, as seen through the filter of the Federal Reserve Board.  As Fed Chair Janet Yellen reminds us after every meeting, the Fed has two goals—lowering the unemployment rate and stabilizing prices.

The Fed’s target unemployment rate is 4.7% to 5.8% and, if you believe the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (see below re: why you shouldn’t), the Fed has accomplished that goal, as the current rate is at an eight-year low of 4.9%.  The Fed’s target inflation rate is 2% and, depending on how you measure inflation, it’s close to that number.Stock Prices

“The Fed’s preferred measure, the personal consumption expenditures price index, rose 1.3% in January from the previous year, and so-called core inflation—which excludes volatile food and energy prices—was 1.7%,” The Wall Street Journal reported. “The consumer-price index rose 1% in February from a year earlier, but core CPI was up 2.3% for the year, the largest 12-month increase since May 2012.”

So the Fed could have logically declared its mission accomplished and begun to gradually increase interest rates, as was expected after December’s initial miniscule rate increase.  So why was the vote at last wek’s meeting 10-1 against a rate hike? (more…)

The Stock Market Needs “Seasonal Adjustment”

Monday, January 18th, 2016

How many jobs did the U.S. economy generate in December?

The correct answer is:

  1. 292,000
  2. 281,000
  3. 11,000
  4. None of the above

David Stockman wrote on his “Contra Corner” blog: “According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), the US economy generated a miniscule 11,000 jobs in the month of December. Yet notwithstanding the fact that almost nobody works outdoors any more, the BLS fiction writers added 281,000 to their headline number to cover the ‘seasonal adjustment.’”

Before "seasonal adjustment."

Before “seasonal adjustment.”

After "seasonal adjustment."

After “seasonal adjustment.”

When we checked the jobs report, the BLS claimed that the economy generated 292,000 jobs in December (after seasonal adjustment), not 281,000.  We couldn’t verify Stockman’s claim that the actual figure should be 11,000, but searching the term “seasonal” turned up a whopping 41 hits in a single news release.  So Stockman’s numbers may not be 100% accurate, but he’s clearly on to something.

The BLS press release noted, “The effect of such seasonal variation can be very large.” But large enough to use a multiplier of 25+?

Stockman wrote that an upward revision for December is typical as an adjustment to account for cold weather, but December 2015 was an exceptionally warm month.  Santa arrived in shorts and sunglasses.  (more…)

Appearance vs. Reality

Monday, April 6th, 2015

Maybe if the good news about the U.S. economy gets repeated often enough, appearance will become reality.

We’re not there yet.

The official word from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics is that the unemployment rate has been cut nearly in half, from a double-digit 10% in October 2009 to just 5.5% today.  As the chart shows, unemployment has been steadily falling and, given today’s improving economy it should continue to fall.  So all is good, right?

Appearance

Appearance

 

Not really.  Even CNBC, which is not exactly an anti-government media outlet, has caught on that the U-3 rate is bogus.

CNBC wrote that, “A number of economists look past the ‘main’ unemployment rate to a different figure the Bureau of Labor Statistics calls ‘U-6,’ which it defines as ‘total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers.’ ”

In other words, the U-6 rate is what any sane individual would consider to be the real unemployment rate.

(more…)

Century Old Fed Has Inflationary History

Friday, December 27th, 2013

With the Federal Reserve Board celebrating its 100th birthday, it’s a good time to look back on the past century to see how The Fed has fared.

We’ve been critical of The Fed’s quantitative easing program, but that accounts for only the past five years of Fed history.  How has it fared in the previous 95 years?  Overall, has its work improved life for Americans or has it been a negative force?Inflation

The Fed’s role is to ensure the safety and soundness of financial institutions, stability of financial markets, and equitable treatment of consumers in financial transactions.  But its activities are primarily focused on using America’s money supply to manage inflation, unemployment and interest rates.

If The Fed has performed its job well, America’s standard of living should be greatly improved today when compared with, say, 1938, when the country was still recovering from The Great Depression.

But MyBudget360 made some surprising discoveries when it compared 1938 prices with today’s prices after using the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics inflation calculator to adjust for inflation.

(more…)

Another Record Smashed: More Than 100,000,000 Americans Not Working

Friday, October 25th, 2013

The Labor Force Participation Rate has fallen and it can’t get up.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported this week that 90,609,000 Americans who are 16 or older are neither working nor looking for work.  Only 63.2% of Americans are working or looking for work.  Anyone who is unemployed who has looked for a job in the past four weeks is counted as participating in the labor force.

LFPRAdd in unemployed Americans who are looking for work and the total exceeds 101 million.  With a total population of about 313,914,040, nearly one American in three is 16 or older and is not working.

The Labor Force Participation Rate peaked at 67.3% in 2000 and it hovered around 66% in 2007 and 2008, when the financial crisis began.  Now, after five years of stimulus spending and quantitative easing, it has dropped about 3%.  In July, the number of nonparticipants climbed by more than half a million.

(more…)

Get Back to Work

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Labor Day has passed.  It’s time to get back to work … or at least think about work.  Work, or the lack of it, is what the economy is all about.  When Americans are working, they spend money.  When they spend money, the economy grows.

So if the economy is truly recovering, as many pundits suggest, then the unemployment rate should be dropping.  So is it?  Maybe. Gallup

On the One Hand

In today’s report, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that during the month of August, nonfarm payroll employment increased by 169,000, bringing the unemployment rate down from 7.4% to 7.3%.  That’s not a significant change, but it beats the 8.1% rate of a year ago.

In addition, the Institute of Supply Management reported this week that its manufacturing index edged up to 55.7 from 55.4 in July.  That’s also not a significant change, but economists had been forecasting a modest decline.  Instead, it was the third straight month of growth, as any reading above 50 indicates growth.  In addition, the new orders index jumped nearly 5% to 63.2.

(more…)

How Baby Boomers Can Benefit the Economy – Keep Working

Friday, May 10th, 2013

If baby boomers decide to postpone their retirement, it may not solve all of the country’s economic problems, but it will help address most of them.

So it’s good news that a growing number of boomers are postponing retirement.  Today, almost 18% of people older than 65 are still working and the number is climbing.  In 1993, only 11% of people older than age 65 were still working, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Of course, many boomers will be forced to keep working, because they have not saved enough or because the performance of their retirement portfolio has not met their expectations.

Others, though, will keep working simply because they want to work.

So how will it help the economy if boomers keep working beyond 65?

Ben, the Great and Powerful

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

“Bernanke said, in essence, that he wasn’t a magician.”

                                                    Heidi Moore, The Guardian

The number one movie in America today, “Oz, the Great and Powerful,” could be a metaphor about The Federal Reserve Board and its role in the American economy.

Oz, a likable scoundrel, is a master of illusion.  There is no substance behind his tricks, but they give the illusion of strength, and, since people believe what they want to believe, he is able to overcome the forces of evil.

Likewise, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke’s prestidigitation relies on quantitative easing to create the illusion of strength.  All appears well when the stock market rises and the unemployment rate drops, even if there is no strength behind the market’s rise and the drop in unemployment is by only 0.2%.

Of course, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has its own illusionists, as we’ve pointed out in the past, who are able to make a 14.4% unemployment rate look like a 7.7% unemployment rate.

(more…)