Posts Tagged ‘Economy’

Maybe the Fed Is Just Lazy

Monday, August 3rd, 2015

Just last month we reported that the Federal Reserve Board’s policy statement was almost identical to its previous policy statement.  Now the Fed has issued another policy statement – and it’s almost identical to the last one.

Granted, there’s not much to say.  The economy has flatlined, the Fed has run out of policy tools and it’s mid-summer … a time when many people spend more time avoiding work than actually working.  But this is the Federal Reserve Board we’re talking about – the people who are in charge of our economy, since neither President Obama nor Congress want to do much about it.

So, for those of you who remember what a “carbon copy” is, the latest policy statement is a carbon copy of the last one.  Maybe we should just re-run our previous blog post. Yellen, Janet

“The most notable change,” as Goldman Sachs’ Chief Economist Jan Hatzius wrote, “was the addition of the word ‘some’ in the committee’s description of desired progress in the labor market.  Specifically, the June FOMC statement said that it will be appropriate to raise interest rates ‘when it has seen further improvement in the labor market’ (and is reasonably confident that inflation will move back to two percent).  Today’s statement said that rate hikes would be appropriate after ‘some further improvement in the labor market.’ ”

So “further” became “some further.”  (more…)

Today’s Economic News: Woe Is Me

Monday, July 27th, 2015

The summer weather and the media’s focus on positive economic news may have you feeling cheerier than usual these days.

Two words: “Bah, humbug.”  Or maybe, “Get real.”

Focus, for a minute, on the cloud, rather than the silver lining; recognize that evaporation has caused the glass to be less than half full (and more than half empty); see the bubble bursting, the interest rates rising and stock prices dropping.  In other words, get realistic about the economy.

In the Keynesian world, the more government spends, the more the economy is “stimulated.” In the real world, more spending means more debt, higher taxes, more regulation and GDP growth well below the historic norm. Chart 1

In the imaginary world, central bankers and government officials can keep the economy growing indefinitely and can boost asset prices to new records forever.  In the real world, asset prices are at artificially induced levels; reality will take hold when the Federal Reserve Board raises interest rates, when China’s stock market tanks (as it has begun to), when Greece is booted out of the Eurozone, or when Iran uses the $150 billion it receives from the lifting of sanctions to further its war against the U.S. and Israel.  (more…)

Big Board Floored

Monday, July 13th, 2015

The Big Board is not so big anymore.

A decade ago, it accounted for 80% of stock trades.  Today, it accounts for 20%.  There are also far fewer publicly traded companies in the U.S. – 5,000+ today, compared with 8,000+ in the 1990s.  The NYSE lists about 2,800 of them.

To trade directly on the NYSE, you used to have to buy a “seat.”  In the 1990s, seats sold for as much as $4 million.  Today, you can buy a license to trade on the NYSE for $40,000.

Regardless, when “the leading stock exchange in the world“ shuts down, even for just a few hours, it’s big news.

The NYSE shut down for three-and-a-half hours on Wednesday, which was unprecedented.  Little information has been shared, but the NYSE has blamed the shutdown on a technical glitch.  Call us skeptical, but the odds of a computer glitch shutting down the NYSE, grounding United Continental Holdings planes and bringing down The Wall Street Journal’s website all on the same day are pretty small. Labor Force_1_0

Thanks to Edward Snowden and irresponsible practices by the U.S. Office of Personnel and Management, people who are not our friends now have access to a wealth of information about us.  We’d rather not think about what will happen if Chinese or Iranian hackers disrupt our electrical grid, but it’s something that should concern all of us.  Its impact not only on your investments, but on our national security, would be devastating.  (more…)

How to Retire Early – Part Two

Monday, July 6th, 2015

In part one of “How to Retire Early,” we focused on the need to reduce expenses and control debt.  Doing so can create the foundation for a retirement plan by making money available for investment.

What should happen next?  Here are a few suggestions:Retirement 4

Consider all sources of income.  Typically, retirement income comes from a combination of an employer pension, personal savings and Social Security income.  Compare what you are eligible to receive with what you will need.

If you have a shortfall, consider all of your options for making it up before you retire.  You may decide to work part-time.  It you have a marketable skill, you may even be able to develop a base of business that provides you with enough income to meet your needs without dipping into your retirement savings for a few years.  Or maybe you have space you can rent out to produce more income. (more…)

What Yellen Should Have Said

Monday, June 22nd, 2015

The question reporters should be asking now is, what did the Federal Reserve Board’s Open Market Committee do for two days last week?

The statement it issued based on its meeting is a rehash of its last statement, which itself was not worth repeating.  Check the link from The Wall Street Journal, which you can use to compare the two most recent statements (as well as others), and you’ll see that the Fed mailed it in this time.

Yellen

These folks are managing our economy.  The fate of the world is in their hands.  And the best they can do is come up with an update to a previous statement.  No wonder the economy has practically flatlined throughout the current “recovery.”

It’s worth adding, though, that the Fed’s Seinfeld approach of having meetings about nothing may be better for the economy and for the American taxpayer than the previous chair’s pronouncements about Operation Twist and unlimited QE programs.

The latest Fed statement starts with this: “Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in January suggests that economic growth has moderated somewhat.”  Really?  What does “has moderated somewhat” mean?  And where is the “information” received from?  NSA wiretaps?  Drones?  Ben Bernanke’s blog?

(more…)

Habitat for Inhumanity

Monday, May 25th, 2015

The idea was logical enough.

Reduce interest rates, making housing more affordable, which would produce a recovery in the housing market.  The housing market was at the heart of the financial crisis, so bringing the housing market back to health would, presumably, bring the economy back to health.

That conclusion was sound, too.  Housing is a leading economic indicator, so a recovering housing market should mean a recovering economy.

But in economics, as in life, things don’t always go as planned.  The housing market still hasn’t recovered.  And, while low interest rates may have given housing prices a boost, they have not increased home ownership.Home Ownership

In addition, government programs have only made matters worse, while costing taxpayers a bundle.

As Lance Roberts noted on his Street Talk blog, “trillions of dollars have been directly focused at the housing markets including HAMP, HARP, mortgage write-downs, delayed foreclosures, government backed settlements of ‘fraud-closure’ issues, debt forgiveness and direct buying of mortgage bonds by the Fed to drive refinancing and purchase rates lower.”

Yet, as the chart shows, the net result has been that the home ownership rate has dropped to where it was in 1980.

Why did government help” fail would-be homeowners?  (more…)

Appearance vs. Reality

Monday, April 6th, 2015

Maybe if the good news about the U.S. economy gets repeated often enough, appearance will become reality.

We’re not there yet.

The official word from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics is that the unemployment rate has been cut nearly in half, from a double-digit 10% in October 2009 to just 5.5% today.  As the chart shows, unemployment has been steadily falling and, given today’s improving economy it should continue to fall.  So all is good, right?

Appearance

Appearance

 

Not really.  Even CNBC, which is not exactly an anti-government media outlet, has caught on that the U-3 rate is bogus.

CNBC wrote that, “A number of economists look past the ‘main’ unemployment rate to a different figure the Bureau of Labor Statistics calls ‘U-6,’ which it defines as ‘total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers.’ ”

In other words, the U-6 rate is what any sane individual would consider to be the real unemployment rate.

(more…)

Bubble Busters

Monday, March 30th, 2015

“I had a stick of CareFree gum, but it didn’t work. I felt pretty good while I was blowing that bubble, but as soon as the gum lost its flavor, I was back to pondering my mortality.”                                                                                                                                                                             Mitch Hedberg

When the news about U.S. markets and the U.S. economy is depressing, I usually read about Europe and feel better about the U.S.

I spent a lot of time reading about Europe this week, but it didn’t do much good – even with Greece continuing to defy logic by pretending that it’s OK to live off of someone else’s money.

The problem is that easy money policy is not so easy anymore.  It never did prop up the U.S. economy, in spite of Keynesian enthusiasm, but at least it created the illusion of economic health by propping up the stock market.  Now, it’s unable to do even that. burst-your-bubble

U.S. markets fell throughout the week, but especially on Wednesday, which saw declines of more than 2% in the Nasdaq and Russell 2000. The Dow dropped nearly 300 points, or 1.6%, while the S&P 500 finished the day about 1.5% lower.  The New York composite stock exchange is now back to where it was last July and the S&P 500 is approaching November levels.

And there’s likely to be more trouble ahead, as a 4% drop in the biotech and semiconductor sectors showed a “classic parabolic reversal,” according to Peter Boockvar, chief market analyst at the Lindsey Group.  A parabolic reversal is a technical indicator that signals a change in an asset’s momentum.

(more…)

Bazooka or Blunderbuss?

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Any day now, it seems that European Central Bank President Mario Draghi’s full head of hair will migrate to his chin and turn gray, as the central banker morphs into former Fed Chair Ben Bernanke.Bazooka 2

Last week, the ECB began its purchase of €60 billion ($64.2 billion) a month in Eurozone government bonds, with total purchases expected to eventually exceed €1 trillion.

He’s called the purchase his “big bazooka,” but it could turn out to be a blunderbuss, an antiquated weapon that’s prone to misfiring.

(more…)

President Underwood Goes Keynesian

Monday, March 9th, 2015

In the latest season of “House of Cards,” President Frank Underwood stakes his political future on a $500 billion program called America Works, which will allegedly create 10 million jobs and bring the U.S. to full employment.Underwood for President

Well, “House of Cards” is fiction.  Ten million jobs creating full employment?  It would help, but it would still be 82,898,000 short, since there are a record 92,898,000 Americans not participating in the workforce. 

Speaking of fiction, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the unemployment rate has fallen from 5.7% to 5.5%.  That’s because, according to Zerohedge, “while the number of unemployed Americans dropped by 274K (and) those employed rose by 96K, the underlying math is that the civilian labor force dropped (by) 157,180 to 157,002 (following the major revisions posted last month), while the people not in the labor force rose by 354,000 in February.”Obama

So once again, a worsening economy brings us closer to full employment in the mythical land of Keynesian America.

How Not to Create Jobs

The bigger fiction, though, is that government spending can fix unemployment.  When it comes to spending, President Underwood is an amateur compared with President Obama, whose first-term stimulus legislation was 66% larger than President Underwood’s.  And it didn’t produce anywhere near 10 million jobs – although President Obama claimed in 2008 that it would put 7 million people to work, including 5 million in “green jobs.”

Know anyone working in a green job created by the stimulus bill?  Tom Steyer doesn’t count. (more…)