Archive for the ‘Consumer Debt’ Category

How To Retire Early – Part One

Monday, June 29th, 2015

How would you like to retire early?  Maybe 62 is a good age or maybe you’d like to retire at 60 or even 55.

But unless you’ve won the lottery, have a government pension, or are the favorite niece or nephew of a rich uncle, you may find it difficult to achieve your goal.  If can still be done, though.  You have two options: cut your expenses or increase your retirement savings.  Better yet, do both.Retirement 1

More specifically, you should be able to take that job and shove it at an age earlier than 65 if you do the following:

Cut back on your expenses.  Even people who think they’re living frugally usually aren’t.  How often do you dine out?  Do you stop for coffee on your way to work?  What do you spend on hair stylists, clothing, manicures and pedicures?  Do you do your own landscaping and mow your own lawn?

Non-essential expenses add up.  Review everything you spend and make a cost-benefit analysis.  Determine whether the convenience and pleasure you derive from your expenses is worth the investment.  Maybe Two-Buck Chuck is no substitute for your favorite Côtes du Rhône, but would you rather drink good wine or retire early?  You may not be able to do both.  (more…)

Why Worry About Climate Change When You’re $18 Trillion in Debt?

Monday, April 13th, 2015

Which crisis scares you more – climate change or our growing debt?

Climate change certainly receives a lot more attention in the media and a lot more attention from politicians, even if they’ve done little about it.

Last week, as one small example, President Obama said in an interview that his push to address climate change was influenced by an asthma attack his daughter Malia had when she was a four-year-old.  Asthma is a medical condition that has no connection to climate change.  It would be as logical to suggest that climate change cured her asthma, since she no longer has it and the climate has continued to deteriorate since she was four. National Debt and Interest 1 Wallace

We’re not suggesting that climate change doesn’t merit serious attention, but even if it’s as big a deal as environmental activists would have us believe, the U.S. is going to have little impact unless China, India and other ozone-busters get on board, too.

Debt, though, which President Obama and most members of Congress rarely talk about, just keeps rolling along.  (more…)

The Economy Is Booming – For the Repo Man

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

“Credit is a sacred trust, it’s what our free society is founded on. Do you think they give a damn about their bills in Russia?”                                                                                                                                                 Bud in “Repo Man”

The good news for the economy is that consumers are buying more.  The bad news is that they’re not paying for what they buy.

The Urban Institute found that more than a third of Americans are not only in debt, but are being chased down by debt collectors.  Debt collectors are, of course, a last resort; they’re used when all else fails and the debtor is more than 180 days past due.  When a consumer goes six months without paying a bill, it’s a good sign the person either has no intention of paying or is unable to pay.

Yet about 77 million Americans – 35% of adults with a credit file – have debt in collections.  They owe an average of $5,178, which doesn’t sound like much, but keep in mind that’s debt that’s gone into collection, not total household debt.  It does not include mortgage debt, but does include credit card, medical and utility debt.

Consumer creditThe average American household has $15,480 in credit card debt alone and consumer debt totals $11.74 trillion.  Add in federal debt, corporate debt, state government debt, municipal debt and the debt of other countries and it’s a wonder that anyone anywhere is still solvent.

You may recall the cheering that took place in 2009, when consumer debt levels decreased.  But, as the chart shows, that was a small mogul on a steep and steadily rising mountain of IOUs.

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We’re All Debtors Now

Friday, March 7th, 2014

You’ve probably heard that corporate America is swimming in cash.  Something like $4 trillion worth of it.  And once corporate America starts spending it, the economy will boom again, jobs will be created, GNP will soar and the stock market will boom ever higher.

Corporate cash is the good news.  Corporate debt is the bad news.

While cash is at record levels, corporate debt now exceeds the level it was at in 2008 and 2009.  In case your memory is really short, that’s when America was wondering whether its financial system would survive.Corporate Debt

But temper your nostalgia for those bad old days.  When we say “exceeds,” we mean that corporate debt is 35% higher than it was then.

Net debt – what you get when you subtract cash from total debt – has been climbing steadily for American companies since 1998, as the chart shows.  It doesn’t mean corporate America is insolvent (not yet, anyway), but it does have nasty implications for future corporate growth, profitability, unemployment and income growth.

Given all of that cash on hand, some are making heady predictions about accelerating capital expenditures.  Goldman Sachs’ David Kostin predicted that capex spending will grow 9% in 2014, compared with 2% growth in 2013.

He may be right, given the need to replace aging and outmoded equipment, but a prediction is only a prediction.  And more capex spending will mean less cash for paying down corporate debt.

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