Archive for the ‘Investing’ Category

Investing Under President Trump

Monday, November 21st, 2016

Is Donald Trump a narcissistic blowhard or an astute businessman with the ability to make America great again?

We will all find out over the next four years, but we should also keep in mind that he will not be running the country by himself. He has a Republican majority in Congress and most states are now run by Republicans (the party that most media were writing obits for a month ago).

trump

Although President-elect Trump is a former Democrat and has expressed support for expanding many government programs, the advisors he has picked to date signal that the regulatory state we’ve lived under for the past eight years will be reined in. That would be good news for the economy and for the markets.

Regardless, he is not Hillary Clinton, who was poised to tack left of President Obama and bring us closer to the socialist state that U.S. Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have been advocating.

While we worry about his stands on trade and immigration, President Trump will undoubtedly be stronger than President Obama, more bipartisan and more focused on economic growth. In all cases, it wouldn’t take much. (more…)

The Stock Market Needs “Seasonal Adjustment”

Monday, January 18th, 2016

How many jobs did the U.S. economy generate in December?

The correct answer is:

  1. 292,000
  2. 281,000
  3. 11,000
  4. None of the above

David Stockman wrote on his “Contra Corner” blog: “According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), the US economy generated a miniscule 11,000 jobs in the month of December. Yet notwithstanding the fact that almost nobody works outdoors any more, the BLS fiction writers added 281,000 to their headline number to cover the ‘seasonal adjustment.’”

Before "seasonal adjustment."

Before “seasonal adjustment.”

After "seasonal adjustment."

After “seasonal adjustment.”

When we checked the jobs report, the BLS claimed that the economy generated 292,000 jobs in December (after seasonal adjustment), not 281,000.  We couldn’t verify Stockman’s claim that the actual figure should be 11,000, but searching the term “seasonal” turned up a whopping 41 hits in a single news release.  So Stockman’s numbers may not be 100% accurate, but he’s clearly on to something.

The BLS press release noted, “The effect of such seasonal variation can be very large.” But large enough to use a multiplier of 25+?

Stockman wrote that an upward revision for December is typical as an adjustment to account for cold weather, but December 2015 was an exceptionally warm month.  Santa arrived in shorts and sunglasses.  (more…)

Happy New Year: Meh.

Monday, January 4th, 2016

Well, it’s a brave new world for us cynics. Somehow, we all survived another year, but it wasn’t easy.

It was a good year for terrorists (Paris, San Bernardino), despots (hello Cuba, Syria, Iran, et al.) and hackers (any repercussions from China’s hacking of government records, federal employees sharing classified documents on unsecure servers, etc.?).

It was a bad year for investors.  Or, if not bad, not so good.  Heck, even Warren Buffett lost money, although he can afford a nick more than the rest of us. 2015

It would be generous to say that stocks ended the year “sideways,” as the year was volatile and the beginning was much more forgiving than the end.  Overall, though, the year was as flat as Twiggy in Nebraska.  As The New York Times put it:

“Name a financial asset — any financial asset.  How did it do in 2015?

“The answer, in all likelihood: Meh.

(more…)

High-Frequency Trading Losing Frequency

Monday, October 5th, 2015

The publication of Michael Lewis’ book Flash Boys early in 2014 brought high-frequency trading (HFT) to the attention of many investors for the first time.

Lewis was quoted on “60 Minutes” saying that HFT rigs the stock market against the small investor. Media made it known that the FBI – the folks who investigate drug dealers and organized crime – was investigating HFT.

Wenning Advice had posted frequently about the practice as early as 2011, warning about the distortion that high-frequency trading causes to market fundamentals, the predatory nature of high-frequency trading, the inequity of high-frequency trading, and the risk that high-frequency trading creates for all of us.  We even pointed out that “Satan is a high-frequency trader.”

Michael Lewis

Michael Lewis

 

But what’s happened to HFT since 2014?  And what happened to the FBI’s investigation of the practice?

HFT has not gone away. But it’s not what it used to be.

We noted in 2011 that HFT accounted for 73% of all equity trading in the U.S., up from 30% four years earlier, based on research from TABB Group.

Rosenblatt Securities estimated that HFT trading volume fell from about 3.25 billion shares a day in 2009 to 1.6 billion shares in 2012. And TABB Group estimated that HFT revenues from U.S. equity trading declined from about $7.2 billion in 2009 to $1.3 billion in 2014.  (more…)

How to Retire Early – Part Two

Monday, July 6th, 2015

In part one of “How to Retire Early,” we focused on the need to reduce expenses and control debt.  Doing so can create the foundation for a retirement plan by making money available for investment.

What should happen next?  Here are a few suggestions:Retirement 4

Consider all sources of income.  Typically, retirement income comes from a combination of an employer pension, personal savings and Social Security income.  Compare what you are eligible to receive with what you will need.

If you have a shortfall, consider all of your options for making it up before you retire.  You may decide to work part-time.  It you have a marketable skill, you may even be able to develop a base of business that provides you with enough income to meet your needs without dipping into your retirement savings for a few years.  Or maybe you have space you can rent out to produce more income. (more…)

How To Retire Early – Part One

Monday, June 29th, 2015

How would you like to retire early?  Maybe 62 is a good age or maybe you’d like to retire at 60 or even 55.

But unless you’ve won the lottery, have a government pension, or are the favorite niece or nephew of a rich uncle, you may find it difficult to achieve your goal.  If can still be done, though.  You have two options: cut your expenses or increase your retirement savings.  Better yet, do both.Retirement 1

More specifically, you should be able to take that job and shove it at an age earlier than 65 if you do the following:

Cut back on your expenses.  Even people who think they’re living frugally usually aren’t.  How often do you dine out?  Do you stop for coffee on your way to work?  What do you spend on hair stylists, clothing, manicures and pedicures?  Do you do your own landscaping and mow your own lawn?

Non-essential expenses add up.  Review everything you spend and make a cost-benefit analysis.  Determine whether the convenience and pleasure you derive from your expenses is worth the investment.  Maybe Two-Buck Chuck is no substitute for your favorite Côtes du Rhône, but would you rather drink good wine or retire early?  You may not be able to do both.  (more…)

The Markets Need Psychotherapy

Monday, December 15th, 2014

“The whole idea that the stock market reflects fundamentals is, I think, wrong.  It really reflects psychology.  The aggregate stock market reflects psychology more than fundamentals.”

Robert Shiller, Nobel Prize-winning economist

Tired of low returns?  You may be a bond investor.

Bond investors have been “growing tired of low returns, the endless warnings that rates are about to rise, and constant reminders of the dangers of riskier bonds,” according to Jeffrey Matthias, CFA, CIPM of Madison Investment Advisors.

At the same time, they’ve watched the stock market continue to break new records every time there’s another sign that a central bank somewhere may buy a few bonds or lower interest rates into negative territory.

“None of us have ever lived through this kind of extreme, long-lasting suppressed rate environment,” Matthias wrote, and, as a result, those bond investors who are mad-as-hell-and-are-not-going-to-take-it-anymore have been frustrated enough to take on a lot more risk for a little more yield. Central Bank Assets

When you chase yield, you catch risk.  It’s a dangerous reaction to the yin and yang of investing – fear and greed.

“Typically, when markets are moving higher,” Matthias wrote, “most investors turn greedy and want more.  Should an investor’s more conservatively positioned portfolio produce lower returns when the market surges, the investor may regret not having taken more risk.  In contrast, should a riskier portfolio drop significantly in market value, the opposite may happen and an investor may begin to regret (his or her) decision to have invested in risker assets.  This can be accompanied by a fearful overreaction.”

(more…)

Less than “Less than Zero”

Friday, September 5th, 2014

In June, the ECB lowered the interest rate on bank deposits, including reserve holdings in excess of the minimum reserve requirements, from zero to -0.10%.  This week, surprising just about everyone not named Mario Draghi, the ECB lowered the rate by another 10 basis points to -0.20%.

14950766600_d52f0bba78_zAs we wrote when the less-than-zero rate was announced, “banks will pay a fee on money they fail to lend out.  Whether or not that stimulates the economy, it could encourage banks to take more risk, approving loans that otherwise may not have been approved.  Isn’t that what caused the financial crisis?”

Zerohedge explained that while rates were already negative, “Now they’re even more negative. Because in the world of Central Banking if something doesn’t work at first the best thing to do is do more of it. Whatever you do, DO NOT question your thinking or your economic models at all.”

(more…)

It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World

Friday, August 8th, 2014

Isn’t summer supposed to be the time when life slows down and the world takes a vacation?

That may be the case for some of us, but the despots of the world are working overtime.  Consider just a few of the world crises taking place this summer:

  • Russia’s conflict with Ukraine continues.  The downing of Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 by pro-Russian rebels has done little to stop it.
  • Hamas is fighting with Israel over Gaza.  A cease fire is in place, but Hamas has shown little respect for previous cease fires and it is unlikely that this crisis has ended.
  • Muslim terrorists known as ISIS are making inroads in Iraq.  It’s reached the point where President Obama has reversed his policy and announced that U.S. military airstrikes will take place “if necessary.”
  • Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad continues to slaughter his people, while the country’s conflict threatens to spill over into Lebanon.
  • The newly inaugurated Libyan parliament has called for a cease fire and threatened to act against warring militias that continue fighting.
  • Al-Qaeda-linked sect Boko Haram continues to hold more than 200 schoolgirls captive in Nigeria.
  • Iran is developing nuclear weapons, although the U.S. State Department said U.S. and Iranian officials had a “constructive discussion” this week about Iran’s nuclear program.  There’s some conjecture that, even if Iran were to agree to halt its nuclear development program, it could outsource the program to North Korea.

    Gaza today.

    Gaza today.

Remember the end of the Cold War, the resulting “peace dividend” and the economic growth of the ’90s?  Remember life before the financial crisis?  Much has happened since then and most of it has not been good.

(more…)

Investing at a Profit Now a Sure Thing – For Some

Friday, May 16th, 2014

Imagine being able to trade stocks and knowing that you will make a profit every day.

Of course, for the average investor, this is impossible.  But mega-banks aren’t average investors.

According to Jim Quinn of The Burning Platform, “JPMorgan experienced ZERO trading loss days in 2013.  Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and most of the mega-banks have had virtually perfect daily trading results since 2010.  If they are all winning, who is losing?”

Banks like JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley can, of course, attract the best and brightest traders, so you would expect above-average results from them.  But how does anyone manage to make it through an entire year without a single day in which trading losses take place?

Through legal theft … also known as high-frequency trading (HFT).  As we’ve previously reported, Michael Lewis’ new book “Flash Boys” shines a light on this dark side of Wall Street, pointing out that HFT enables Wall Street’s biggest players to buy shares at one price, then sell them to investors at a higher price in a practice known as front running.

(more…)