Posts Tagged ‘Janet Yellen’

The Fed’s Abnormalization Plan

Monday, June 26th, 2017

The Federal Reserve Board has issued an addendum to its “Policy Normalization Principles and Plans” for reducing its bulked up $4.5 trillion portfolio, but there’s nothing normal about unloading $4.5 trillion in bonds.

That’s a lot of bonds.

The Fed’s policy, which virtually no one has read since it was issued in November 2014, is an update of its 2011 normalization policy, which no one read. It crams quite a few words into a single page, which we would summarize by saying that the Fed hopes to unload as much of its bond holdings as it can without causing the bond market to collapse.

Fed Will “Cease or Commence”

In case you don’t believe me, here’s a sample paragraph: “The (Federal Open Market Committee) expects to cease or commence phasing out reinvestments after it begins increasing the target range for the federal funds rate; the timing will depend on how economic and financial conditions and the economic outlook evolve.”

Note the “cease or commence.” In other words, the Fed will either stop buying bonds to keep its portfolio close to $4.5 trillion or it won’t. Talk about commitment issues! (more…)

Deceptive Pricing

Monday, September 26th, 2016

If you had to believe one of the following people, who would you choose?

Heather Bresch, CEO of Mylan, makers of the EpiPen: “The misconception about our profits is understandable, and at least partly due to the complex environment in which pharmaceutical prices are determined.”

John Stumpf, CEO of Wells Fargo: “First of all, this was by 1% of our people.”

Janet Yellen, chair of the Federal Reserve Board: “In general, I would not say that asset valuations are out of line with historical norms.”yellen

Two of the three people above were brought before Congressional committees so they could be scolded by U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren and other upstanding, ethically pure members of Congress. Which two?

And finally, which of the three people above have had the greatest impact on you and on the economy?

Stumpf Grilled

Mr. Stumpf’s days as CEO of Wells Fargo are apparently numbered, because some of his company’s minions decided to open accounts for bank customers who never authorized them to be opened. This was done by employees to make quotas and earn bonuses. (more…)

Grading on a Curve

Monday, July 18th, 2016

 “We do not target the level of stock prices.                     That is not an appropriate thing for us to do.”

                                    Fed Chair Janet Yellen

 It’s the equivalent of social passing or grading on a curve. While the stock market is breaking new records, its recent performance is not a reflection of reality.

As Larry Fink, chairman and CEO of BlackRock, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” “I don’t think we have enough evidence to justify these levels in the equity market at this moment.” Buybacks

He said the recent rally has been driven by institutional investors covering shorts (i.e., hedging bets that stock prices would fall), and not by bullish individual investors. In fact, he noted that outflows in mutual funds show that individual investors are becoming squeamish about stock prices.

Institutional investors were short going into Brexit, but are recalibrating their portfolios, Fink said, given that the Brexit aftershock has not been as long-lasting as expected. While some may have been concerned about the economic impact of the United Kingdom voting to leave the European Union, ultimately its impact on markets was muted by the knowledge that Brexit would most likely keep the Fed from increasing interest rates anytime this year.  (more…)

Theater of the Absurd

Monday, June 20th, 2016

Vladimir: “Well? What do we do?”

Estragon: “Don’t let’s do anything. It’s safer.”

From “Waiting for Godot” 

In Waiting for Godot, two men spend more than an hour talking nonsense and it’s called Theater of the Absurd.

After last week’s Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting, Fed Chair Janet Yellen spent an hour talking nonsense and it was called a press conference. But, really, it could be argued that the Fed is at least as absurd as anything in Waiting for Godot. Much of the dialogue in Godot could, in fact, have come from the FOMC.  For example …

Vladimir: “I don’t understand.”

Estragon: “Use your intelligence, can’t you?”

Vladimir uses his intelligence.

Vladimir: (finally) “I remain in the dark.”

Janet Yellen: “Although the unemployment rate has declined, job gains have diminished.”talawa waiting godot

Estragon: “I can’t go on like this.”

Vladimir: “That’s what you think.”

The FOMC has continued ZIRP (zero interest rate policy) for 90 months. Estragon and Valdimir waited for Godot for only a couple of days.  (more…)

Something’s Rotten …

Monday, April 4th, 2016

“That it should come to this!”

                                  Hamlet, Act I, Scene II

Any student of Shakespeare will recall that Hamlet’s procrastination did not bode well for Denmark.

Centuries later, the Scandinavian country has Tivoli and perhaps the world’s best ice cream, but it’s not exactly a world power.  It may not be Hamlet’s fault–after all, Denmark is even more socialistic than the U.S. and Canada–but his hesitation was not a good thing for him or his country.YellenHamlet 2

So what does this have to do with Janet Yellen?  She chairs the Federal Reserve Board, which, like Denmark, has wielded its power clumsily, although it doesn’t even produce ice cream.  And, like the tragic prince, she will likely be remembered more for her inaction than for her action.

Even Hamlet didn’t procrastinate for years, although it may seem that way if you watch a poor production of the famous play. Also, like the melancholy Prince of Denmark, Ms. Yellen seems to be collapsing under the weight of the world and fretting over the potential consequences of her actions. And so, like Hamlet, she does nothing.

Her words before the New York Economic Club last week could have come straight out of Hamlet. Princess Yellen may be far less eloquent than the young prince of Denmark, but the parallels between what she said and what he said are significant. (more…)

Don’t Bet On It

Monday, December 28th, 2015

 “ … human beings have a natural tendency to manage risk after the fact.”

                              Michael A. Gayed, Pension Partners

 If I were betting on the ponies, Janet Yellen (or any Federal Reserve Board member, for that matter), would not be my first choice to bring along for consultation.

As we’ve previously pointed out, the Fed’s forecasting record is pretty lame.  The Fed has consistently projected a higher level of growth for the economy than we’ve actually seen (although even Fed projections are consistently well below the 3.3% average growth the economy enjoyed in the years between the end of World War II and the financial crisis). Fed Forecasts

The Fed projected growth rate for 2015 was 2.6% to 3%. While it’s too early to tell what the final numbers will be, the just-released latest estimate from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) for the third quarter of 2015 was 2.0% (down from its previous estimate of 2.1%), which isn’t too far off from the 1.5% growth rate for the first half of 2015.

As David Stockman noted, “Notwithstanding the most aggressive monetary stimulus in recorded history – 84 months of ZIRP and $3.5 trillion of bond purchases – average real GDP growth has barely amounted to 50% of the Fed preceding year forecast; and even that shortfall is understated owing to the BEA’s systemic suppression of the GDP deflator.” (more…)

The Big Disconnect

Monday, December 7th, 2015

Imagine being stuck in a blizzard.  You look out your window and can see the snow piling up outside, yet the meteorologist on your TV is forecasting continuing sunshine and near tropical weather.

That level of disconnect is similar to that shown by some members of the Federal Reserve Board, who are preparing for liftoff, even as the economy implodes like a SpaceX rocket. The difference, though, is that the SpaceX failure was an unmanned flight; when the Fed acts, we’re all on board, like it or not.Fed Meteorologist

We recently reported that a couple of members of the Federal Open Market Committee had spoken publicly in favor of a rate hike. But this past week, they were no longer the outliers, as even Fed Chair Janet Yellen joined in during a speech before the Economic Club of Washington.

USA Today reported, “Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen signaled Wednesday that the Fed is all but certain to raise interest rates this month for the first time in nearly a decade, saying that gains in the economy and labor market have met the central bank’s goals.”

If you read on, though, that’s not quite what she said.  Given that inflation is nowhere near the Fed’s 2% goal, she couldn’t say that the central bank’s goals have been met. (more…)

ZIRP Everlasting

Monday, September 21st, 2015

Some things never change.  Apparently, the interest rate for Federal funds is one of them.

To the surprise of no one – except the “experts” and journalists who have been writing about an anticipated rate increase – the Federal Reserve Board voted last week to keep interest rates flatlined at about zero, which is where they’ve been since 2008.

The Fed may not have raised interest rates, but it at least raised interest this time. The International Business Times called it, “one of the most widely anticipated Federal Reserve decisions in decades.”

Really?  Why was this meeting any different from previous Fed meetings where interest rates remained unchanged?  Because the media-academic-pundit intelligentsia decided that it was time to increase rates.Yellen

In a Wall Street Journal poll of economists in August, 82% of economists thought the Fed would raise rates in September.  The week before the Fed met, 46% picked September as the most likely time for the Fed’s rate hike, 9.5% said the Fed would wait until October and 35% predicted that the Fed would wait until December.  Just 9.5% predicted the Fed would wait until 2016 to raise rates.

The economists polled don’t have seats on the Federal Open Market Committee, but everyone assumes they must know something. (more…)

Yellen’s Soliloquy: To Raise or Not to Raise

Monday, August 10th, 2015

To raise, or not to raise – that is the question:

Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The barbs and insults of outraged pundits and journalists

Or to raise rates in spite of a sea of troubles

And by raising rates extend them. To stagnate, to grow —

No more (than 2%) – and by a flatlined economy to say we end

The headache, and the thousand natural shocks

The stock market is heir to.

We could go on imagining Fed Chair Janet Yellen in the role of Hamlet, another famous person who met with tragedy due to procrastination.  We could make note of “the law’s delay, the insolence of office, and the spurns that patient merit of th’ unworthy takes,” even if we don’t know what “spurns” Shakespeare was talking about when he wrote Hamlet.

We could go on, but “conscience does make cowards of us all,” so we’ll leave it at that and turn instead to last week’s comments by Dennis Lockhart, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.  Lockhart said “the economy is ready for the first increase in short-term interest rates in more than nine years and it would take a significant deterioration in the data to convince him not to move in September.” Yellen as Hamlet

The experts will tell you that anticipation of increasing rates is built into current stock prices, but if that’s the case, why did stock prices drop to their lowest levels since February after Lockhart’s remarks?  Maybe it was the disappointing earnings reports for the quarter, or the still-not-there employment numbers, but the most direct correlation appears to be with the fear of rising interest rates.

Keep in mind, too, that the statement didn’t come from the chairwoman.  Granted, Mr. Lockhart is a member of the Federal Open Market Committee, but he’s not Janet Yellen.  Perhaps the idea was to see what impact his comments would have so the Fed as a whole would still have the option to not raise rates in September.  Mr. Lockhart apparently drew the short straw at the last FOMC meeting.  (more…)

Maybe the Fed Is Just Lazy

Monday, August 3rd, 2015

Just last month we reported that the Federal Reserve Board’s policy statement was almost identical to its previous policy statement.  Now the Fed has issued another policy statement – and it’s almost identical to the last one.

Granted, there’s not much to say.  The economy has flatlined, the Fed has run out of policy tools and it’s mid-summer … a time when many people spend more time avoiding work than actually working.  But this is the Federal Reserve Board we’re talking about – the people who are in charge of our economy, since neither President Obama nor Congress want to do much about it.

So, for those of you who remember what a “carbon copy” is, the latest policy statement is a carbon copy of the last one.  Maybe we should just re-run our previous blog post. Yellen, Janet

“The most notable change,” as Goldman Sachs’ Chief Economist Jan Hatzius wrote, “was the addition of the word ‘some’ in the committee’s description of desired progress in the labor market.  Specifically, the June FOMC statement said that it will be appropriate to raise interest rates ‘when it has seen further improvement in the labor market’ (and is reasonably confident that inflation will move back to two percent).  Today’s statement said that rate hikes would be appropriate after ‘some further improvement in the labor market.’ ”

So “further” became “some further.”  (more…)