The Neverending Story

Why change?

It’s been more than five years since The Federal Reserve Board began its quantitative easing program.  We’ve had QE, QE 2, Operation Twist and the never-ending QE 3.  The Fed’s portfolio of bonds exceeds $4 trillion and it now owns more than a third of all bonds issued by the U.S. government.

The net result of this never-before attempted experiment in easy money policy has been a still slumping job market, growth around 2% vs. a non-QE average of 3.3% and a drop in personal income of 4.7% since the “recovery” began.  At least there hasn’t been any deflation.

Yet new Fed Chair Janet Yellen announced this week that she’s “staying the course,” continuing QE maybe forever.  Although she said she plans to continue tapering, too, she added that the bond buying program is “not on a preset course,” so perhaps The Fed may taper its tapering, creating an untapering by buying even more bonds.

After all, $65 billion a month doesn’t buy what it used to, even with today’s low rate of inflation.

The market reacted positively, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average jumping nearly 200 points.  Once again, just as it looked like the market was reacting to real business conditions, the Queen of QE proved that the market is still firmly under the Fed’s control.

What Ceiling?

Remember “The Neverending Story?”  The book, which was made into a movie, takes place in a fantasyland, in which a dark entity called “The Nothing” threatens to consume everything.  In the neverending story of QE, “The Nothing” could be The Fed itself, consuming every bond in sight, or the federal government, consuming everything and casting a pall of new regulations that threaten job growth and recovery.

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No, We Can’t

Someone had blunder’d:
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die.

                                          From “The Charge of the Light       Brigade”

Take pity on the can.  It’s been kicked so far down the road, it could circle the globe a dozen times.  It’s been battered more than the New England Patriots’ starting lineup.  It’s been kicked harder than an Adam Vinatieri football.

And still it persists.

This week, Congress and President Obama reached a deal that reopens the government through January 15 and suspends the debt ceiling through February 7.  Calling it a deal, though, is an exaggeration.  One side, the Democrats, refused to negotiate.  The other side, the Republicans, asked for something it had no hope of getting.  So everyone agreed to kick the can three months down the road.free-the-fowl-games-photo-420-1196-FF11015_0

Beyond that, according to The Wall Street Journal, “The bill includes one minor change to the health law sought by Republicans, setting new procedures to verify the incomes of some people receiving government subsidies for health-insurance costs.  It also provides back pay for all federal workers who were furloughed during the government shutdown.”

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Spending Our Way to Prosperity

Focusing on the government shutdown is like rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic while drawing closer to the iceberg.

The iceberg in this case is the massive government debt that will be made worse by the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

Later this month, Congress will need to lift the debt ceiling from its current $16.7 trillion to keep the government solvent and enable the U.S. to continue paying its massive bills.  In the meantime, as a result of the negotiations that led to sequestration, Congress had until the end of September (the end of the fiscal year) to reach a spending agreement.Yield Curve

It didn’t, of course, and now the government has shut down.  But what does the shutdown really mean?

The shutdown affects only “nonessential” services.  That means 85% of government services are still being funded and 63% of federal employees are still working.  Mail is being delivered, military personnel are still keeping us safe, and payments are still being made for Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the countless other programs that we can’t afford.  Amtrak trains will continue running, so if your train is late, don’t blame it on the shutdown.

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One Man’s Ceiling Is Another Man’s Floor

“There’s been some hard feelings here
About some words that were said …
Remember, one man’s ceiling is another man’s floor.”
                                                         Paul Simon

Here we go again. Hold on to your wallets, taxpayers. It’s time for another debt ceiling “negotiation.”

We use the term “negotiation” loosely, as it’s now extinct in Washington.

On one side, we have House Republicans waging an unwinnable battle, saying they’ll agree to suspend the debt ceiling limit for a year in exchange for a one-year delay of the individual mandate for ObamaCare, tax reform, approval of the Keystone pipeline and other concessions. While such changes would potentially provide a huge benefit to the economy, they have zero chance of passing in the Senate, which is controlled by the Democratic majority.Debt ceiling

On the other side, we have President Obama and Senate Democrats saying the Republicans are trying to shut down the federal government, because they are not willing to lift the debt ceiling without concessions from the President.

There will be no concessions by the Democrats. As President Obama put it, “I will not negotiate on anything when it comes to the full faith and credit of the United States of America.”

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