Archive for the ‘Unemployment’ Category

The Job Creation Snow Job

Monday, June 6th, 2016

Consider this headline from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: Unemployment rate declines to 4.7% in May; payroll employment changes little (+38,000).

Great news, right? The unemployment rate fell to just 4.7% in May, the lowest it’s been since before the financial crisis began.

But take a closer look.

The consensus was that the U.S. economy would create 160,000 jobs in May. That’s a pretty modest number—but not nearly as modest as the actual number. It turns out that the experts were off by about 420%. The U.S. economy created a meager 38,000 jobs in May.Employment

And, by the way, the BLS also announced that the economy created 59,000 fewer jobs in March and April than previously estimated. In other words, the BLS reported a net loss of 21,000 jobs. (more…)

Set. Down. No Hike.

Monday, March 21st, 2016

The economic outlook can be summed up in five words: Everything’s great, except what isn’t.

We’ll lead with the “everything’s great” part, as seen through the filter of the Federal Reserve Board.  As Fed Chair Janet Yellen reminds us after every meeting, the Fed has two goals—lowering the unemployment rate and stabilizing prices.

The Fed’s target unemployment rate is 4.7% to 5.8% and, if you believe the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (see below re: why you shouldn’t), the Fed has accomplished that goal, as the current rate is at an eight-year low of 4.9%.  The Fed’s target inflation rate is 2% and, depending on how you measure inflation, it’s close to that number.Stock Prices

“The Fed’s preferred measure, the personal consumption expenditures price index, rose 1.3% in January from the previous year, and so-called core inflation—which excludes volatile food and energy prices—was 1.7%,” The Wall Street Journal reported. “The consumer-price index rose 1% in February from a year earlier, but core CPI was up 2.3% for the year, the largest 12-month increase since May 2012.”

So the Fed could have logically declared its mission accomplished and begun to gradually increase interest rates, as was expected after December’s initial miniscule rate increase.  So why was the vote at last wek’s meeting 10-1 against a rate hike? (more…)

The Stock Market Needs “Seasonal Adjustment”

Monday, January 18th, 2016

How many jobs did the U.S. economy generate in December?

The correct answer is:

  1. 292,000
  2. 281,000
  3. 11,000
  4. None of the above

David Stockman wrote on his “Contra Corner” blog: “According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), the US economy generated a miniscule 11,000 jobs in the month of December. Yet notwithstanding the fact that almost nobody works outdoors any more, the BLS fiction writers added 281,000 to their headline number to cover the ‘seasonal adjustment.’”

Before "seasonal adjustment."

Before “seasonal adjustment.”

After "seasonal adjustment."

After “seasonal adjustment.”

When we checked the jobs report, the BLS claimed that the economy generated 292,000 jobs in December (after seasonal adjustment), not 281,000.  We couldn’t verify Stockman’s claim that the actual figure should be 11,000, but searching the term “seasonal” turned up a whopping 41 hits in a single news release.  So Stockman’s numbers may not be 100% accurate, but he’s clearly on to something.

The BLS press release noted, “The effect of such seasonal variation can be very large.” But large enough to use a multiplier of 25+?

Stockman wrote that an upward revision for December is typical as an adjustment to account for cold weather, but December 2015 was an exceptionally warm month.  Santa arrived in shorts and sunglasses.  (more…)

How Ben Bernanke Saved the World

Monday, October 12th, 2015

“It became necessary to destroy the town to save it.”

                    U.S. major talking about Bến Tre, Vietnam

The Wall Street Journal doesn’t have a humor section, so “How the Fed Saved the Economy” appeared on the op-ed pages under the byline of Ben Bernanke, former chair of the Federal Reserve Board.

In his commentary, Bernanke takes credit for saving the economy – rather than responsibility for the most dismal recovery in history.Bernanke

Anyone who has read even one of our blog posts knows that we would disagree with any claim about the Fed saving the world, especially given that the economy continues its slow-motion deterioration after nearly eight years and several trillion dollars’ worth of “saving” by the Fed.

However, Mr. Bernanke has a book to sell.  And while it will likely appear in the non-fiction section, we’re guessing by its title that it is even more self-congratulatory and less fact-filled (if that’s possible) than his op-ed piece. (more…)

Today’s Economic News: Woe Is Me

Monday, July 27th, 2015

The summer weather and the media’s focus on positive economic news may have you feeling cheerier than usual these days.

Two words: “Bah, humbug.”  Or maybe, “Get real.”

Focus, for a minute, on the cloud, rather than the silver lining; recognize that evaporation has caused the glass to be less than half full (and more than half empty); see the bubble bursting, the interest rates rising and stock prices dropping.  In other words, get realistic about the economy.

In the Keynesian world, the more government spends, the more the economy is “stimulated.” In the real world, more spending means more debt, higher taxes, more regulation and GDP growth well below the historic norm. Chart 1

In the imaginary world, central bankers and government officials can keep the economy growing indefinitely and can boost asset prices to new records forever.  In the real world, asset prices are at artificially induced levels; reality will take hold when the Federal Reserve Board raises interest rates, when China’s stock market tanks (as it has begun to), when Greece is booted out of the Eurozone, or when Iran uses the $150 billion it receives from the lifting of sanctions to further its war against the U.S. and Israel.  (more…)

Big Board Floored

Monday, July 13th, 2015

The Big Board is not so big anymore.

A decade ago, it accounted for 80% of stock trades.  Today, it accounts for 20%.  There are also far fewer publicly traded companies in the U.S. – 5,000+ today, compared with 8,000+ in the 1990s.  The NYSE lists about 2,800 of them.

To trade directly on the NYSE, you used to have to buy a “seat.”  In the 1990s, seats sold for as much as $4 million.  Today, you can buy a license to trade on the NYSE for $40,000.

Regardless, when “the leading stock exchange in the world“ shuts down, even for just a few hours, it’s big news.

The NYSE shut down for three-and-a-half hours on Wednesday, which was unprecedented.  Little information has been shared, but the NYSE has blamed the shutdown on a technical glitch.  Call us skeptical, but the odds of a computer glitch shutting down the NYSE, grounding United Continental Holdings planes and bringing down The Wall Street Journal’s website all on the same day are pretty small. Labor Force_1_0

Thanks to Edward Snowden and irresponsible practices by the U.S. Office of Personnel and Management, people who are not our friends now have access to a wealth of information about us.  We’d rather not think about what will happen if Chinese or Iranian hackers disrupt our electrical grid, but it’s something that should concern all of us.  Its impact not only on your investments, but on our national security, would be devastating.  (more…)

Economic Schizophrenia

Monday, June 8th, 2015

Schizophrenia is “a long-term mental disorder of a type involving a breakdown in the relation between thought, emotion, and behavior, leading to faulty perception, inappropriate actions and feelings, withdrawal from reality and personal relationships into fantasy and delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation.”Personal Income

In general use it is referred to as “a mentality or approach characterized by inconsistent or contradictory elements.”  It is also often used to refer to someone with a split personality.

It is a truly severe mental disorder that is difficult to treat.  And it seems to be a perfect description of today’s economy.

Thursday: Don’t Raise Rates This Year

As a recent example, consider last week’s announcement by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) that it was lowering its growth estimate for the U.S. economy from 3.1% to 2.5%.  Both estimates are well below the 3.3% annual growth rate that was the norm before the financial crisis, but even 2.5% is average the average we’ve seen throughout the Obama presidency. (more…)

Appearance vs. Reality

Monday, April 6th, 2015

Maybe if the good news about the U.S. economy gets repeated often enough, appearance will become reality.

We’re not there yet.

The official word from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics is that the unemployment rate has been cut nearly in half, from a double-digit 10% in October 2009 to just 5.5% today.  As the chart shows, unemployment has been steadily falling and, given today’s improving economy it should continue to fall.  So all is good, right?

Appearance

Appearance

 

Not really.  Even CNBC, which is not exactly an anti-government media outlet, has caught on that the U-3 rate is bogus.

CNBC wrote that, “A number of economists look past the ‘main’ unemployment rate to a different figure the Bureau of Labor Statistics calls ‘U-6,’ which it defines as ‘total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers.’ ”

In other words, the U-6 rate is what any sane individual would consider to be the real unemployment rate.

(more…)

AP Poll: Americans Want Less Economic Growth

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Well, here’s a shocker.  A new AP poll shows that a majority of Americans want a higher minimum wage.  They also want paid sick leave and parental leave, free community college and more gender equality laws.  And, of course, they want wealthy taxpayers to pay for all of it.

Who wouldn’t?  The poll doesn’t ask about the resulting economic impact of these feel-good policies.

Polls are supposed to be objective.  They rarely are.  Asking Americans if they support a higher minimum wage isn’t too far removed from asking, “Do you want to help poor people?” Transfer Payments

Pollsters will never ask questions such as, “Studies show that increasing the minimum wage results in fewer jobs and slower economic growth.  Do you favor an increase in the minimum wage?”

The Poll That Will Never Be

To provide some balance, perhaps AP should poll Americans about the following questions.

Do you favor higher unemployment and lower economic growth?

It’s basic economics that when the price of something goes up, demand falls.  Increasing the minimum wage, and requiring paid sick leave and parental leave may be desirable for employees, but many would lose their jobs as a result.

(more…)

Economic Dissonance

Monday, February 9th, 2015

In today’s economy, the theory of cognitive dissonance is itself dissonant.

Social psychologist Leon Festinger believed that humans strive for internal consistency, and that two or more contradictory beliefs cause mental stress.  Yet in today’s world, it seems that every policy, every vote, every executive order is designed to contradict rationality and add to our collective mental stress.

We’ve given a few examples of economic dissonance in the past:

The stock market.  During six years of quantitative easing (QE), bad economic news caused the stock market to rise and good economic news caused the stock market to fall.  That’s because bad news meant more Fed bond buying and good news made bond buying unnecessary.

Higher inflation.  Lower oil prices have done more to give the economy a boost than trillions of dollars in bond buying – yet the Federal Reserve Board has fretted that the U.S. is headed toward deflation.  Its policies were designed to increase inflation to the magic rate of 2%.  Why 2%?  No one seems to know.College Costs

The unemployment rate.  The widely used U-3 unemployment rate drops when people give up looking for work and leave the workforce.  As a result, we have absurdities such as this latest report from The Boston Globe:

“U.S. employers hired at a stellar pace last month, wages rose by the most in six years, and Americans responded by streaming into the job market to find work.

“The Labor Department says the economy gained a seasonally adjusted 257,000 jobs in January. The unemployment rate rose slightly to 5.7 percent from 5.6 percent.”

So Americans are “streaming into the job market” – causing an increase in the unemployment rate! (more…)