Archive for the ‘Asset Bubble’ Category

Let’s Ignore the Central Banks

Monday, April 11th, 2016

What if we all decided to ignore the central banks?

Granted, they have provided material for this blog non-stop from the day it started.  They keep financial journalists, economists, analysts, pundits and other financial fortune tellers employed.  They keep the stock market pumped up when it can’t achieve new records of its own merit. They appear be the only people in the world tasked with managing the economy (even if they are mismanaging it, rather than managing it).

So why should we ignore them?

They’re frequently wrong.  The Federal Reserve Board, our country’s central bank, has a history of causing, not solving crises.  Former Fed Chair Alan Greenspan is not even mentioned in “The Big Short,” but some give him top blame for causing the 2007 housing bubble and the financial crisis that followed. Benchmark

“Alan Greenspan will go down in history as the person most responsible for the enormous economic damage caused by the housing bubble and the subsequent collapse of the market,” according to The Guardian.

Noting the plunging housing prices and high unemployment in 2013, when the article was written, The Guardian reported that, “The horror story could have easily been prevented had there been intelligent life at the Federal Reserve Board in the years when the housing bubble was growing to ever more dangerous proportions (2002-2006). But the Fed did nothing to curb the bubble. Arguably, it even acted to foster its growth with Greenspan cheering the development of exotic mortgages and completely ignoring its regulatory responsibilities.”

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Correct Yourself

Monday, August 31st, 2015

Last week was a tough week for investors, given that the market dropped for six consecutive days. It was an even tougher week for financial advisors and investment managers who have been advising clients to keep a heavy allocation of stocks in their portfolios.

Advisors who are telling their clients to invest a greater percentage of their portfolios into stocks should be able to answer clients’ questions about why they are so optimistic that stock prices will continue to increase.Exp_2013_11_21_0

Investors, likewise, should ask why they are following that advice.  Investors need to be accountable for their future.  If their advisors are wrong, they will pay the price, not their advisors.

Answer These Questions

Given the state of the world economy – and stock markets throughout the world – many questions need to be answered.  Here are some of them:

Where is future growth going to come from? Don’t look to China, which may claim to be growing at 7% this year, but few believe it. Don’t look to the U.S., where baby boomers are retiring and millions of people in all age groups have stopped looking for work.

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Worry About China, Not Greece

Monday, July 20th, 2015

When’s the last time markets reacted positively to anything happening in Greece?

Last week, just 10 days after Greek voters voted against a resolution that would have required stiffer austerity measures in return for a third Eurozone bailout, the Greek Parliament voted 229 to 64 with six abstentions in favor of harsher austerity measures than would have been required if voters approved the resolution.

As The Economist put it, “Grief, psychiatrists say, has many stages, from denial to acceptance; and Greece seems to have raced through them all.” Shanghai

So Greece needs psychiatric help.  That should have been clear years ago.  These are the folks who elected Alexis Tsipras of the wacky extreme-left Syriza Party as their prime minster.

Tsipras quickly found that his socialist machismo wasn’t very effective, given that his country needs billions of euros just to survive.  So maybe it’s not surprising that he and the Greek Parliament caved so quickly.

Not everyone was pleased. Fellow Syrizan Zoi Konstantopoulou, the parliamentary speaker, called it a “very black day for democracy in Europe.”  Since when does a socialist worry about democracy?

But enough about Greece.  Which country should we be worried about?  (more…)