Posts Tagged ‘Greece’

Worry About China, Not Greece

Monday, July 20th, 2015

When’s the last time markets reacted positively to anything happening in Greece?

Last week, just 10 days after Greek voters voted against a resolution that would have required stiffer austerity measures in return for a third Eurozone bailout, the Greek Parliament voted 229 to 64 with six abstentions in favor of harsher austerity measures than would have been required if voters approved the resolution.

As The Economist put it, “Grief, psychiatrists say, has many stages, from denial to acceptance; and Greece seems to have raced through them all.” Shanghai

So Greece needs psychiatric help.  That should have been clear years ago.  These are the folks who elected Alexis Tsipras of the wacky extreme-left Syriza Party as their prime minster.

Tsipras quickly found that his socialist machismo wasn’t very effective, given that his country needs billions of euros just to survive.  So maybe it’s not surprising that he and the Greek Parliament caved so quickly.

Not everyone was pleased. Fellow Syrizan Zoi Konstantopoulou, the parliamentary speaker, called it a “very black day for democracy in Europe.”  Since when does a socialist worry about democracy?

But enough about Greece.  Which country should we be worried about?  (more…)

Big Board Floored

Monday, July 13th, 2015

The Big Board is not so big anymore.

A decade ago, it accounted for 80% of stock trades.  Today, it accounts for 20%.  There are also far fewer publicly traded companies in the U.S. – 5,000+ today, compared with 8,000+ in the 1990s.  The NYSE lists about 2,800 of them.

To trade directly on the NYSE, you used to have to buy a “seat.”  In the 1990s, seats sold for as much as $4 million.  Today, you can buy a license to trade on the NYSE for $40,000.

Regardless, when “the leading stock exchange in the world“ shuts down, even for just a few hours, it’s big news.

The NYSE shut down for three-and-a-half hours on Wednesday, which was unprecedented.  Little information has been shared, but the NYSE has blamed the shutdown on a technical glitch.  Call us skeptical, but the odds of a computer glitch shutting down the NYSE, grounding United Continental Holdings planes and bringing down The Wall Street Journal’s website all on the same day are pretty small. Labor Force_1_0

Thanks to Edward Snowden and irresponsible practices by the U.S. Office of Personnel and Management, people who are not our friends now have access to a wealth of information about us.  We’d rather not think about what will happen if Chinese or Iranian hackers disrupt our electrical grid, but it’s something that should concern all of us.  Its impact not only on your investments, but on our national security, would be devastating.  (more…)

Bet You Can’t Count to a Quadrillion

Monday, May 18th, 2015

When someone uses “quadrillion” in a headline, you know you’re in for a bit of an alarmist rant. We’re talking 1,000,000,000,000,000, which, stated another way, is a thousand million million.  Or a million billion.  Or a thousand trillion.

Stated in dollars, that’s more than the debt racked up by the federal government since President Obama took office.  Way more.  It’s even way more than the Federal Reserve Board spent buying bonds when it was in QE mode. Chart 1

So when Bill Holter of Global Research wrote an article with the headline, “Derivatives are a $1 Quadrillion ‘Ticking Time Bomb,’ ” it caught our attention.

So did the series of charts he included, which showed movements in the government bond market that were double-black-diamond steep, even without moguls.

We’re talking government bonds here, not junk bonds, not commodities, not emerging market stocks.  Government bonds are Nebraska – flat and predictable.  During volatile times, they’re the bunny slope, not a double-black diamond.

So what’s up with the volatility?

(more…)

Alexis the Not-So-Great

Monday, February 16th, 2015

A lot can happen in 2,500 years.

Back in its day, Greece ruled the world – albeit, it was a much smaller world.  But that was a long, long time ago.  So long ago, we routinely refer to the Greece of those days as “ancient Greece;” the only thing it has in common with the Greece of today is its geography.

Greece has gone from Alexander the Great to Alexis the Not-So-Great.  That would be Alexis Tsipras, leader of the Coalition of the Radical Left, who was elected prime minister in January.  Tsipras’ plan for bringing his country back to solvency is to pretend its debts don’t exist and to keep on spending.  After all, that worked so well for Argentina.Greek debt

After being bailed out twice by Eurozone leaders, Greece is no closer to solving its economic problems.  The only difference now is that it has more debt.  If Greece were a person, you’d cross the street if you saw him approaching, because you know he’d bum money off of you and use it to bet on the ponies.

The Eurozone’s bailouts were contingent upon Greece following an austerity program.  But Greeks have had enough of austerity and elected Tsipras as the anti-austerity candidate.  So after two bailouts, Greece is still an economic failure – and it’s all Germany’s fault, since Germany actually wants Greece to stick to its austerity program and pay back its loans.

(more…)

A Sign of Rising Interest Rates?

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

The U.S. Federal Reserve surprised the market last week by raising the U.S. discount rate by a quarter of a point (0.25%).

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke insists the rate hike should not be considered to be monetary tightening, but the bond market doesn’t answer to the Fed Chairman and recognizes that the interest-rate cycle has reached the point where tightening has begun.

There are other signs that a trend of interest rates moving higher has begun.

Generally, when the stock market sells off, the bond market moves in the opposite direction.  When news about Greece’s debt problems hit the market and stock prices declined, typically we would have seen a significant flight to safety, resulting in a significant rally in the bond market.  We saw some shifting of assets to safer investments, but the shift quickly faded.

To identify a trend, investment managers typically look at the long end of the curve, and the 30-year bond showed signs of weakness, in spite of Greece’s debt problems.

Whether rising interest rates is indeed a trend should be determined during the week ahead, with new Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) offerings.  Up for auction will be:

  • $44 billion in two-year Treasuries
  • $42 billion in five-year notes
  • $32 billion in seven-year notes
  • $8 billion in 30-year TIPS

 The 30-year TIPS offering is the first offering of that duration since 2001, as some have considered a 30-year maturity as being unnecessarily long.  Whether the 30-year TIPS will stimulate investor interest remains to be seen.  If the auction is poorly received, higher rates will most likely be on the horizon.  Stay tuned.