Posts Tagged ‘ZIRP’

Theater of the Absurd

Monday, June 20th, 2016

Vladimir: “Well? What do we do?”

Estragon: “Don’t let’s do anything. It’s safer.”

From “Waiting for Godot” 

In Waiting for Godot, two men spend more than an hour talking nonsense and it’s called Theater of the Absurd.

After last week’s Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting, Fed Chair Janet Yellen spent an hour talking nonsense and it was called a press conference. But, really, it could be argued that the Fed is at least as absurd as anything in Waiting for Godot. Much of the dialogue in Godot could, in fact, have come from the FOMC.  For example …

Vladimir: “I don’t understand.”

Estragon: “Use your intelligence, can’t you?”

Vladimir uses his intelligence.

Vladimir: (finally) “I remain in the dark.”

Janet Yellen: “Although the unemployment rate has declined, job gains have diminished.”talawa waiting godot

Estragon: “I can’t go on like this.”

Vladimir: “That’s what you think.”

The FOMC has continued ZIRP (zero interest rate policy) for 90 months. Estragon and Valdimir waited for Godot for only a couple of days.  (more…)

Don’t Bet On It

Monday, December 28th, 2015

 “ … human beings have a natural tendency to manage risk after the fact.”

                              Michael A. Gayed, Pension Partners

 If I were betting on the ponies, Janet Yellen (or any Federal Reserve Board member, for that matter), would not be my first choice to bring along for consultation.

As we’ve previously pointed out, the Fed’s forecasting record is pretty lame.  The Fed has consistently projected a higher level of growth for the economy than we’ve actually seen (although even Fed projections are consistently well below the 3.3% average growth the economy enjoyed in the years between the end of World War II and the financial crisis). Fed Forecasts

The Fed projected growth rate for 2015 was 2.6% to 3%. While it’s too early to tell what the final numbers will be, the just-released latest estimate from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) for the third quarter of 2015 was 2.0% (down from its previous estimate of 2.1%), which isn’t too far off from the 1.5% growth rate for the first half of 2015.

As David Stockman noted, “Notwithstanding the most aggressive monetary stimulus in recorded history – 84 months of ZIRP and $3.5 trillion of bond purchases – average real GDP growth has barely amounted to 50% of the Fed preceding year forecast; and even that shortfall is understated owing to the BEA’s systemic suppression of the GDP deflator.” (more…)

Just In Time for Christmas

Monday, December 21st, 2015

Even if it were wrapped in shiny paper with a big red bow on it, virtually everyone would have guessed at this year’s Christmas present from the Federal Reserve Board.

For most of us, the rate hike will be the equivalent of coal in our stockings, but for the economists, analysts, stock pickers, pundits, talking heads and other assorted Fed groupies, the rate hike was essential, because it validates their existence.  After inaccurately predicting a rate hike throughout 2015, they finally got it right! 20151217_BAML1

The hike of 25 to 50 basis points in the federal funds rate is an insignificant increase (the Fed’s Board of Governors will raise the interest rate paid on reserves to 0.5% and the Federal Open Market Committee will offer a rate of 0.25% on reverse repurchase agreements), except that it represents the end of an era.  ZIRP, or zero-interest-rate policy, has now been replaced with ZIRP+ or maybe Near ZIRP, Almost ZIRP or A-Tad-Above ZIRP.  It’s still as close to ZIRP as you can get without being ZIRP.

Questions Raised

Regardless, after 84 months of ZIRP, it’s worth noting that interest rates have changed direction and are now heading up.  ZIRP was already old when this blog was started in January 2010.  Now what are we going to write about?  (more…)

Taper Tantrum Two

Monday, November 16th, 2015

Call it Taper Tantrum Two.

Two of the 12 members of the Federal Open Market Committee suggested on Thursday that it’s time to raise interest rates, causing the Dow Jones Industrial Average to drop 254 points.

To get a better idea of how ludicrous this is, consider the following:

  • The two hawks represent a sixth of the board. The hawks will need to more than triple their numbers to represent a majority.
  • Stock ChartThe two Fed members were speaking at a Cato Institute event called, “Rethinking Monetary Policy.” The event was not called, “Seven More Years of ZIRP,” “Zero Everlasting” or “Bring on QE4.”  Why would anyone be surprised that they spoke in favor of a rate hike?
  • One of the two, St. Louis Federal Reserve President James Bullard, is an alternate member of the FOMC and has long been advocating for a rate hike. This is the guy who caused the Dow to drop 100 points when he suggested in June 2014 that interest rates might be hiked in the first quarter of 2015.  We tried to determine the role of an alternate member, but the Federal Reserve Board’s description is about as clear as a Fed policy statement.  The page says there are 12 members of the FOMC, but lists 10, as well as four alternates.  So how do they come up with 12?  These are the people who are managing our economy.

(more…)

A Way Out for the Fed

Monday, November 2nd, 2015

The economy grew at a tepid rate of 1.5% during the third quarter.  More than 100 million Americans aren’t working.  And the inflation rate is near zero.

That’s after seven years of the most radical monetary policy in history, which was supposed to lower unemployment while boosting the inflation rate to 2%.  If you’re the Federal Reserve Board, do you:

  • Conclude that keeping interest rates near zero isn’t helping the economy and abandon that policy.
  • Keep doing what you’re doing, hoping things will change next year, so you can take credit for it.
  • Conclude that the economy is still a mess even after you bought a few trillion dollars’ worth of bonds, so maybe you need to buy more bonds.

    When economists think rates will rise.

    When economists think rates will rise.

The correct answer, at least last week, was b., as the Fed voted to continue its zero interest rate policy (ZIRP), “surprising no one,” as The Wall Street Journal noted.

That means the Fed will keep on zirping, at least until December, but more likely into 2016.

Subject to Interpretation

The Fed’s policy statement, which has changed about as much as Fed policy over the past seven years, was interpreted by many to imply that the Fed “might” increase interest rates by a whole 0.25% when it meets in December.

(more…)

Big Board Floored

Monday, July 13th, 2015

The Big Board is not so big anymore.

A decade ago, it accounted for 80% of stock trades.  Today, it accounts for 20%.  There are also far fewer publicly traded companies in the U.S. – 5,000+ today, compared with 8,000+ in the 1990s.  The NYSE lists about 2,800 of them.

To trade directly on the NYSE, you used to have to buy a “seat.”  In the 1990s, seats sold for as much as $4 million.  Today, you can buy a license to trade on the NYSE for $40,000.

Regardless, when “the leading stock exchange in the world“ shuts down, even for just a few hours, it’s big news.

The NYSE shut down for three-and-a-half hours on Wednesday, which was unprecedented.  Little information has been shared, but the NYSE has blamed the shutdown on a technical glitch.  Call us skeptical, but the odds of a computer glitch shutting down the NYSE, grounding United Continental Holdings planes and bringing down The Wall Street Journal’s website all on the same day are pretty small. Labor Force_1_0

Thanks to Edward Snowden and irresponsible practices by the U.S. Office of Personnel and Management, people who are not our friends now have access to a wealth of information about us.  We’d rather not think about what will happen if Chinese or Iranian hackers disrupt our electrical grid, but it’s something that should concern all of us.  Its impact not only on your investments, but on our national security, would be devastating.  (more…)

How Low Can You Go?

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

The weather has done it again.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics last week reported annualized growth of a piddling 0.2% for the first quarter of 2015.  The culprit, of course, is not bad policy, but bad weather, if you believe the Federal Reserve Board.

Last year the economy would have boomed during the first quarter, no doubt, if not for the “polar vortex,” but instead it shrunk by more than 2% (experts use the oxymoron “negative growth”).  The same people who believe that will likely believe that the U.S. economy would have boomed during the first quarter of 2015 if not for the dreadful winter.

At least no one’s using the term “polar vortex” to describe the non-stop snowfall that hit much of America this past winter.  And this year’s first quarter growth is multiples better than last year’s first quarter mini-recession.

Winter may be over, but the economy remains cooled.  The Fed is likely hoping for monsoons, tidal waves and earthquakes over the next few quarters to rationalize yet more non-growth in an economy that falls short of Fed projections.  Per the chart below, the Fed has been overly optimistic about economic growth for each of the past four years – and that streak is likely to continue this year, given first quarter performance. Fed Growth Predictions

Fed predictions for the future continue to be rose-colored, but not as rosy as they were previously, based on the Fed policy statement issued last week.

“Federal Reserve policy makers said some of the headwinds holding back the U.S. will probably fade and give way to ‘moderate’ growth,” Bloomberg reported.  Maybe the Fed considers 0.3% annualized growth to be “moderate,” since it would be a 50% improvement over the first quarter.

(more…)

Bubble Busters

Monday, March 30th, 2015

“I had a stick of CareFree gum, but it didn’t work. I felt pretty good while I was blowing that bubble, but as soon as the gum lost its flavor, I was back to pondering my mortality.”                                                                                                                                                                             Mitch Hedberg

When the news about U.S. markets and the U.S. economy is depressing, I usually read about Europe and feel better about the U.S.

I spent a lot of time reading about Europe this week, but it didn’t do much good – even with Greece continuing to defy logic by pretending that it’s OK to live off of someone else’s money.

The problem is that easy money policy is not so easy anymore.  It never did prop up the U.S. economy, in spite of Keynesian enthusiasm, but at least it created the illusion of economic health by propping up the stock market.  Now, it’s unable to do even that. burst-your-bubble

U.S. markets fell throughout the week, but especially on Wednesday, which saw declines of more than 2% in the Nasdaq and Russell 2000. The Dow dropped nearly 300 points, or 1.6%, while the S&P 500 finished the day about 1.5% lower.  The New York composite stock exchange is now back to where it was last July and the S&P 500 is approaching November levels.

And there’s likely to be more trouble ahead, as a 4% drop in the biotech and semiconductor sectors showed a “classic parabolic reversal,” according to Peter Boockvar, chief market analyst at the Lindsey Group.  A parabolic reversal is a technical indicator that signals a change in an asset’s momentum.

(more…)

Another Year of ZIRP?

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

When the economy recovers, interest rates will go up, right?

That’s been the Federal Reserve Board’s line for years now.  Yet as the Fed gushes about an allegedly booming economy, some are saying that interest rates are unlikely to increase this year.

So what gives?Interest Rate Chart

Last week’s Federal Open Market Committee Statement, which summarizes monetary policy, noted that since the FOMC’s December meeting, “the economy has been expanding at a solid pace.”  The statement notes that the unemployment rate is declining, consumer spending is increasing and, if not for that troublesome housing market, everything would be just dandy.

As if to put an exclamation point on the FOMC statement, Fed Chair Janet Yellen met with Congressional Democrats last week to reiterate just how fine the economy is doing.  (The real purpose of the meeting may have been to explain the FOMC statement to members of Congress, as it contains phrases such as, “underutilization of labor resources continues to diminish;” which could have been worded more clearly by saying, “Many former middle managers are still working as greeters at WalMart.”) (more…)