Economic Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is “a long-term mental disorder of a type involving a breakdown in the relation between thought, emotion, and behavior, leading to faulty perception, inappropriate actions and feelings, withdrawal from reality and personal relationships into fantasy and delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation.”Personal Income

In general use it is referred to as “a mentality or approach characterized by inconsistent or contradictory elements.”  It is also often used to refer to someone with a split personality.

It is a truly severe mental disorder that is difficult to treat.  And it seems to be a perfect description of today’s economy.

Thursday: Don’t Raise Rates This Year

As a recent example, consider last week’s announcement by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) that it was lowering its growth estimate for the U.S. economy from 3.1% to 2.5%.  Both estimates are well below the 3.3% annual growth rate that was the norm before the financial crisis, but even 2.5% is average the average we’ve seen throughout the Obama presidency.

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The Year of “May”

We’re well into January, but 2014 demanded a bit of reflection before commenting.  Was it a good year or a bad year?

We still don’t know.  We’re calling it the Year of “May,” although that title could have gone to 2013, 2012, 2011 or even 2010.

Using “may” in a sentence illustrates why 2014 was the Year of “May.”  The economy may be improving, but it may not be improving by much.  Interest rates may go up, but they may stay put for a while.  The Federal Reserve Board may be done with quantitative easing, but it may be using other easy money measures to keep the stock market lovefest going.  Europe may also begin quantitative easing.2014

In 2015, we may find out what Fed Chair Janet Yellen means by “macroprudential supervision.”  During 2014, we may have joined the rest of the world in moving toward deflation, or, if the economy really is improving, we may soon be meeting – or even exceeding – the Fed’s inflation expectations.

See how useful that word “may” is?  It sums up a year in three letters.  It’s so noncommittal, so indefinite, so milquetoast … so 2014.  We may be at war with the Islamic State, Russia may be taking over eastern Europe and the Middle East may be in worse shape than it was before the Arab Spring.  Then, again, it may not be.

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QE RIP

So the Federal Reserve Board has made it official.  This is the end of quantitative easing.  It’s quits for QE.  Bond buying has gone bye bye.  Quantitative easing has been eased out of existence, tapered into extinction.  The QE case is closed.

If nothing else, QE has provided us with material for more of our blog posts than any other topic (55, not including this one!), so, given that we’ll now need a new source of inspiration, we’re almost sorry to see it end. Fed Portfolio

So is this an obituary for the greatest (in terms of dollars involved, if not in results) experiment ever in monetary policy?  Should we hoist up the “Mission Accomplished” banner, pop the champagne cork and make a toast to Ben Bernanke and his brethren?

Not so fast.  There’s still an epilogue worth drafting.  Closure is needed.  This may be our last chance to take a shot at QE, so we’re taking advantage of it.

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Repeat After Me: The Economy Is Improving. The Economy Is Improving.

If you repeat something often enough, you may even start to believe it.

So try this phrase: “The economy is improving.  The economy is improving.  The economy is improving.”

Certainly, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Propaganda (aka, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis or BEA) would have you think that’s the case.  The BEA initially reported growth in gross domestic product (GDP) of 4% for the second quarter of 2014.  That seemed like quite a leap from the first quarter’s -2.9% contraction, but the BEA adjusted that number to “negative growth” of -2.1%. Household Income

That’s old news, though.  Thanks to “a larger than previously estimated increase in nonresidential fixed investment,” the BEA announced in August that second quarter growth was really 4.2%.  A swing of 6.3% in a single quarter!  Well done!

But wait … there’s more.  The BEA announced in September that second quarter growth was 4.6%!  The BEA cited “growing personal consumption, private inventory investment, exports, both residential and nonresidential fixed investment, as well as local government spending,” none of which apparently existed when the BEA gave its first two estimates.

We can hardly wait for October 30, when the BEA is scheduled to report Q3 results.  Maybe by then, we’ll learn that second quarter growth exceeded 5%.  It will be interesting to find out whether Q1’s negative growth was an aberration or whether Q2’s giant leap forward was an aberration.

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Bad News Is Good News

Good news.  The economy still stinks.

In today’s economy, which is driven by The Federal Reserve Board’s quantitative easing (QE) program, bad news is good news and good news is bad news.  That’s because if the economic news is bad, The Fed will be more likely to continue buying bonds, propping up the stock market.

A month ago, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) estimated an annualized growth rate of 2.4% for the first quarter of 2013, but on Wednesday the BEA revised its estimate and said the economy grew at a rate of only 1.8%, a full 25% drop.

Growth of 1.8% is 45% lower than the 3.3% average annual growth in gross domestic product (GDP) the U.S. economy has enjoyed post-World War II.  Yet the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 each jumped a full percentage point on the news.  The DJIA was up 149.83 points and the S&P 500 was up 15.23 points.

Why QE?

The goal of QE, we were told, was to cut unemployment to 6.5%.  After more than five years and three rounds of QE (plus Operation Twist), the une

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