Archive for the ‘Recession’ Category

Nothing Lasts Forever

Monday, December 14th, 2015

If the Federal Reserve Board has used all of its policy tools during the current expansion, what happens when there’s a recession?

That’s a question worth asking, even as the Fed appears ready to raise interest rates, albeit by just a smidgen, based on the pretext that ZIRP (zero interest rate policy) is no longer needed, given today’s allegedly booming economy.

On course, the economy’s not booming and we may even be heading into a recession, assuming we aren’t already in one (it’s hard to tell in today’s slow growth-no growth economy). Average Recovery

Just one sign that the boom is an illusion is the length of the current expansion.  The average recovery since the end of World War II has been 58 to 61 months, depending on whose numbers you use.  The current “recovery” hit the 58-month milestone in April 2014 – 20 months ago. As David Stockman pointed out this week in his “Contra Corner” blog, “the only expansion that was appreciably longer than the present tepid affair was the 119 month stretch of the 1990s.”

Nothing lasts forever and even Larry Summers, the former Treasury secretary and current Harvard professor, recognizes that the current expansion may be nearing an end. As he wrote last week in a Washington Post op-ed, “U.S. and international experience suggests that once a recovery is mature, the odds that it will end within two years are about half and that it will end in less than three years are over two-thirds.  Because normal growth is now below 2 percent rather than near 3 percent, as has been the case historically, the risk may even be greater now.”

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Polar Vortex or Recession Redux?

Friday, May 30th, 2014

The recovery that wasn’t a recovery may have come to an end, as the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported that gross domestic product dropped by 1% during the first quarter of 2014.

Even with the drop in GDP, lower housing sales and continued high unemployment, no one is saying the economic is in a recession.  Perhaps when a recovery is as insignificant as the one we’ve experienced for nearly five years, the distinction between recession and recovery is insignificant.

The economy was in sad shape five years ago and it’s in sad shape today, in spite of record stimulus spending, bond buying, and warm and fuzzy messages from the President, Congress and the Fed.

Quarter-to-Quarter-Changes-in-Real-GDP-Percent-Change_chartbuilder-1But fear not.  The bar is so low now, even a baby step over it will look like a high jump.  At least that’s the opinion of PNC Chief Economist Stuart Hoffman who wrote, “I believe this real GDP decline, mostly due to the polar vortex, coiled the ‘economic spring’ even tighter for a sharp snap-back (boing!) this quarter, where I have an above-consensus forecast for a 4.0% annualized rise in real GDP.”

In other words, bad news for the first quarter is good news for the second quarter.  Stop me if you’ve heard that story before.

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The Economic Recovery That No One Noticed

Friday, April 25th, 2014

The average recovery since the end of World War II has been 58 months.  The current “recovery” has just reached that milestone.

So maybe we should be celebrating.  But what’s to celebrate?econ_expansion25_405

If you were to define “recovery” as a period when gross domestic project (GDP) increases from one quarter to the next, yes, we’ve been in a recovery.  But a recovery is typically reflected by a period that also includes, among other things, low unemployment, strong consumer spending, increasing income, higher inflation and strong manufacturing.

Most of those signs of recovery have been either barely visible or missing, and GDP has been growing about as fast as a bonsai tree.

This has been, and will likely continue to be, the recovery that no one noticed.  It’s a recovery in name only, as for most Americans it doesn’t feel much different than a recession.  Consider what’s been happening:

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