Archive for August, 2015

Correct Yourself

Monday, August 31st, 2015

Last week was a tough week for investors, given that the market dropped for six consecutive days. It was an even tougher week for financial advisors and investment managers who have been advising clients to keep a heavy allocation of stocks in their portfolios.

Advisors who are telling their clients to invest a greater percentage of their portfolios into stocks should be able to answer clients’ questions about why they are so optimistic that stock prices will continue to increase.Exp_2013_11_21_0

Investors, likewise, should ask why they are following that advice.  Investors need to be accountable for their future.  If their advisors are wrong, they will pay the price, not their advisors.

Answer These Questions

Given the state of the world economy – and stock markets throughout the world – many questions need to be answered.  Here are some of them:

Where is future growth going to come from? Don’t look to China, which may claim to be growing at 7% this year, but few believe it. Don’t look to the U.S., where baby boomers are retiring and millions of people in all age groups have stopped looking for work.

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Five Reasons Why Wenning Advice Is Worth More Than Buzzfeed

Monday, August 24th, 2015

You may have heard that Americans are now getting their news online, instead of reading it in newspapers.  They’re not.

Most of what appears online and is called “news” fits that classification only in the broadest sense of the word.  Instead of going online to read about the Iranian nuclear deal, the economic turmoil in China or continuing slow growth in the U.S., Americans are reading about the Kardasians, Caitlyn Jenner and ex-Subway pitchman Jared Fogle.FTSE

If you doubt the above, consider that NBCUniversal just announced it is investing $200 million in Buzzfeed, which now has a value of $1.5 billion.

Buzzfeed, as you’re probably aware, is a site that is notorious for its lists.  Today, for example, you can find “16 Sexts Every Twentysomething Actually Wants,” “40 Random Thoughts We’ve All Had The Night Before School” and “99 Names For B**bs” (Note: our standards are higher than Buzzfeed’s, but you can probably figure it out).

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China’s Fix Could Break Things

Monday, August 17th, 2015

Imagine if free markets were allowed to be free.

Of course, in today’s world, they’re not.  Central bankers and government agencies have taken control.  Not knowing what to do with it hasn’t stopped them. 

China is the latest case in point.  We recently suggested that investors worry about China, not about Greece, although for a tiny country Greece gives everyone plenty to worry about.  But China should be the center of everyone’s attention, given its attempt to fix its falling stock market and boost imports by devaluing the yuan.China

While it’s impossible to guess the intentions of China’s rulers – and they’re not about to share them – the 1.9% devaluation announced last week smacks of desperation.  China’s stock market has been swooning this summer and its exports are down by 8.3% (much larger than the expected 1.5% decrease), which is not good for future growth.

In addition, The Wall Street Journal noted, “Pockets of manufacturing have been especially hard hit, as reflected in sluggish electricity use and falling rail cargo. Especially scary is the prospect of deflation; producer prices were down 5.4% from a year ago.”

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Yellen’s Soliloquy: To Raise or Not to Raise

Monday, August 10th, 2015

To raise, or not to raise – that is the question:

Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The barbs and insults of outraged pundits and journalists

Or to raise rates in spite of a sea of troubles

And by raising rates extend them. To stagnate, to grow —

No more (than 2%) – and by a flatlined economy to say we end

The headache, and the thousand natural shocks

The stock market is heir to.

We could go on imagining Fed Chair Janet Yellen in the role of Hamlet, another famous person who met with tragedy due to procrastination.  We could make note of “the law’s delay, the insolence of office, and the spurns that patient merit of th’ unworthy takes,” even if we don’t know what “spurns” Shakespeare was talking about when he wrote Hamlet.

We could go on, but “conscience does make cowards of us all,” so we’ll leave it at that and turn instead to last week’s comments by Dennis Lockhart, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.  Lockhart said “the economy is ready for the first increase in short-term interest rates in more than nine years and it would take a significant deterioration in the data to convince him not to move in September.” Yellen as Hamlet

The experts will tell you that anticipation of increasing rates is built into current stock prices, but if that’s the case, why did stock prices drop to their lowest levels since February after Lockhart’s remarks?  Maybe it was the disappointing earnings reports for the quarter, or the still-not-there employment numbers, but the most direct correlation appears to be with the fear of rising interest rates.

Keep in mind, too, that the statement didn’t come from the chairwoman.  Granted, Mr. Lockhart is a member of the Federal Open Market Committee, but he’s not Janet Yellen.  Perhaps the idea was to see what impact his comments would have so the Fed as a whole would still have the option to not raise rates in September.  Mr. Lockhart apparently drew the short straw at the last FOMC meeting.  (more…)

Maybe the Fed Is Just Lazy

Monday, August 3rd, 2015

Just last month we reported that the Federal Reserve Board’s policy statement was almost identical to its previous policy statement.  Now the Fed has issued another policy statement – and it’s almost identical to the last one.

Granted, there’s not much to say.  The economy has flatlined, the Fed has run out of policy tools and it’s mid-summer … a time when many people spend more time avoiding work than actually working.  But this is the Federal Reserve Board we’re talking about – the people who are in charge of our economy, since neither President Obama nor Congress want to do much about it.

So, for those of you who remember what a “carbon copy” is, the latest policy statement is a carbon copy of the last one.  Maybe we should just re-run our previous blog post. Yellen, Janet

“The most notable change,” as Goldman Sachs’ Chief Economist Jan Hatzius wrote, “was the addition of the word ‘some’ in the committee’s description of desired progress in the labor market.  Specifically, the June FOMC statement said that it will be appropriate to raise interest rates ‘when it has seen further improvement in the labor market’ (and is reasonably confident that inflation will move back to two percent).  Today’s statement said that rate hikes would be appropriate after ‘some further improvement in the labor market.’ ”

So “further” became “some further.”  (more…)