Archive for the ‘Manufacturing’ Category

More Government, Less Manufacturing

Monday, August 29th, 2016

As the first country to mass produce everything from automobiles to computers, America has a well-deserved reputation for innovation, thanks to its manufacturing sector. U.S. government employees, conversely, are most adept at producing paperwork, as we’ve previously noted.

So which sector do you think employs more people in the U.S.—those who produce or those who bog down production with new regulations?

The answer—and it’s not even close—is that government employees outnumber employees working in manufacturing. In fact, as of a year ago, there were 21,995,000 government employees and 12,329,000 manufacturing employees.  That’s 1.8 government employees for each manufacturing employee, or one employee to produce and nearly two employees to regulate.manufacturing_and_government_employees-1939-2015

Granted, not all government employees are regulators and many serve valuable roles … but is it healthy for the economy to have nearly twice as many employees working in government as we have working in manufacturing?

It didn’t used to be this way. Until August 1989, manufacturing employees outnumbered government employees. But that month, government employed 17,989,000 and manufacturing employed 17,964,000. The two sectors have been going in opposite directions ever since. (more…)

The Economic Recovery That No One Noticed

Friday, April 25th, 2014

The average recovery since the end of World War II has been 58 months.  The current “recovery” has just reached that milestone.

So maybe we should be celebrating.  But what’s to celebrate?econ_expansion25_405

If you were to define “recovery” as a period when gross domestic project (GDP) increases from one quarter to the next, yes, we’ve been in a recovery.  But a recovery is typically reflected by a period that also includes, among other things, low unemployment, strong consumer spending, increasing income, higher inflation and strong manufacturing.

Most of those signs of recovery have been either barely visible or missing, and GDP has been growing about as fast as a bonsai tree.

This has been, and will likely continue to be, the recovery that no one noticed.  It’s a recovery in name only, as for most Americans it doesn’t feel much different than a recession.  Consider what’s been happening:

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Key Indicators Negative Across The Board

Friday, May 17th, 2013

The worst things get, the more they stay the same.

As the stock market continues to set records, the latest Philadelphia Fed Business Outlook Survey shows that the business outlook for manufacturing is weakening.  Of course, that could help continue to boost the market, since it gives The Fed an excuse to continue its quantitative easing.

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