Alexis the Not-So-Great

A lot can happen in 2,500 years.

Back in its day, Greece ruled the world – albeit, it was a much smaller world.  But that was a long, long time ago.  So long ago, we routinely refer to the Greece of those days as “ancient Greece;” the only thing it has in common with the Greece of today is its geography.

Greece has gone from Alexander the Great to Alexis the Not-So-Great.  That would be Alexis Tsipras, leader of the Coalition of the Radical Left, who was elected prime minister in January.  Tsipras’ plan for bringing his country back to solvency is to pretend its debts don’t exist and to keep on spending.  After all, that worked so well for Argentina.Greek debt

After being bailed out twice by Eurozone leaders, Greece is no closer to solving its economic problems.  The only difference now is that it has more debt.  If Greece were a person, you’d cross the street if you saw him approaching, because you know he’d bum money off of you and use it to bet on the ponies.

The Eurozone’s bailouts were contingent upon Greece following an austerity program.  But Greeks have had enough of austerity and elected Tsipras as the anti-austerity candidate.  So after two bailouts, Greece is still an economic failure – and it’s all Germany’s fault, since Germany actually wants Greece to stick to its austerity program and pay back its loans.

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Economic Dissonance

In today’s economy, the theory of cognitive dissonance is itself dissonant.

Social psychologist Leon Festinger believed that humans strive for internal consistency, and that two or more contradictory beliefs cause mental stress.  Yet in today’s world, it seems that every policy, every vote, every executive order is designed to contradict rationality and add to our collective mental stress.

We’ve given a few examples of economic dissonance in the past:

The stock market.  During six years of quantitative easing (QE), bad economic news caused the stock market to rise and good economic news caused the stock market to fall.  That’s because bad news meant more Fed bond buying and good news made bond buying unnecessary.

Higher inflation.  Lower oil prices have done more to give the economy a boost than trillions of dollars in bond buying – yet the Federal Reserve Board has fretted that the U.S. is headed toward deflation.  Its policies were designed to increase inflation to the magic rate of 2%.  Why 2%?  No one seems to know.College Costs

The unemployment rate.  The widely used U-3 unemployment rate drops when people give up looking for work and leave the workforce.  As a result, we have absurdities such as this latest report from The Boston Globe:

“U.S. employers hired at a stellar pace last month, wages rose by the most in six years, and Americans responded by streaming into the job market to find work.

“The Labor Department says the economy gained a seasonally adjusted 257,000 jobs in January. The unemployment rate rose slightly to 5.7 percent from 5.6 percent.”

So Americans are “streaming into the job market” – causing an increase in the unemployment rate!

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Another Year of ZIRP?

When the economy recovers, interest rates will go up, right?

That’s been the Federal Reserve Board’s line for years now.  Yet as the Fed gushes about an allegedly booming economy, some are saying that interest rates are unlikely to increase this year.

So what gives?Interest Rate Chart

Last week’s Federal Open Market Committee Statement, which summarizes monetary policy, noted that since the FOMC’s December meeting, “the economy has been expanding at a solid pace.”  The statement notes that the unemployment rate is declining, consumer spending is increasing and, if not for that troublesome housing market, everything would be just dandy.

As if to put an exclamation point on the FOMC statement, Fed Chair Janet Yellen met with Congressional Democrats last week to reiterate just how fine the economy is doing.  (The real purpose of the meeting may have been to explain the FOMC statement to members of Congress, as it contains phrases such as, “underutilization of labor resources continues to diminish;” which could have been worded more clearly by saying, “Many former middle managers are still working as greeters at WalMart.”)

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