Archive for the ‘Stock Market’ Category

How to Retire Early – Part Two

Monday, July 6th, 2015

In part one of “How to Retire Early,” we focused on the need to reduce expenses and control debt.  Doing so can create the foundation for a retirement plan by making money available for investment.

What should happen next?  Here are a few suggestions:Retirement 4

Consider all sources of income.  Typically, retirement income comes from a combination of an employer pension, personal savings and Social Security income.  Compare what you are eligible to receive with what you will need.

If you have a shortfall, consider all of your options for making it up before you retire.  You may decide to work part-time.  It you have a marketable skill, you may even be able to develop a base of business that provides you with enough income to meet your needs without dipping into your retirement savings for a few years.  Or maybe you have space you can rent out to produce more income. (more…)

Stock Market Continues to Set Records, But Why?

Monday, June 1st, 2015

Let’s take a simple quiz and answer the following multiple choice question.

The stock market is hitting new highs because:

  1. Corporate earnings are at an all-time high.
  2. The economy is recovering.
  3. The market is being manipulated by the Federal Reserve Board.
  4. Investors lack common sense.

Corporate earnings are supposed to drive stock prices.  That used to be true, before the market was made dysfunctional by Fed mingling, high-frequency trading, overbearing regulations and other factors.  It’s not true anymore.  At least not now. S&P 500

The stock market has been setting records, even though S&P company earnings declined 13% in the first quarter of 2015.  That follows a 14% declined in the fourth quarter of 2014.  Do you see a trend here?

As our friend Charlie Bilello of Pension Partners, LLC pointed out on Contra Corner, six out of the ten major S&P 500 sectors showed year-over-year declines, including consumer sectors, which were supposed to have benefited most from a decline in gas prices.

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Bubble Busters

Monday, March 30th, 2015

“I had a stick of CareFree gum, but it didn’t work. I felt pretty good while I was blowing that bubble, but as soon as the gum lost its flavor, I was back to pondering my mortality.”                                                                                                                                                                             Mitch Hedberg

When the news about U.S. markets and the U.S. economy is depressing, I usually read about Europe and feel better about the U.S.

I spent a lot of time reading about Europe this week, but it didn’t do much good – even with Greece continuing to defy logic by pretending that it’s OK to live off of someone else’s money.

The problem is that easy money policy is not so easy anymore.  It never did prop up the U.S. economy, in spite of Keynesian enthusiasm, but at least it created the illusion of economic health by propping up the stock market.  Now, it’s unable to do even that. burst-your-bubble

U.S. markets fell throughout the week, but especially on Wednesday, which saw declines of more than 2% in the Nasdaq and Russell 2000. The Dow dropped nearly 300 points, or 1.6%, while the S&P 500 finished the day about 1.5% lower.  The New York composite stock exchange is now back to where it was last July and the S&P 500 is approaching November levels.

And there’s likely to be more trouble ahead, as a 4% drop in the biotech and semiconductor sectors showed a “classic parabolic reversal,” according to Peter Boockvar, chief market analyst at the Lindsey Group.  A parabolic reversal is a technical indicator that signals a change in an asset’s momentum.

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Patience Pays Off for Fed, Investors

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

The new word is “patient.”  And it’s a humdinger.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average soared more than 700 points over two days last week after Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen announced that the Fed will be “patient” about ending its easy money stance. DJIA

It took three months of hard work for the Fed to come up with the new word, but apparently it was time well spent.

In September, as we’ve reported, the Fed announced that it would wait a “considerable time” before raising interest rates.  That caused much fretting.  Media such as The New York Times devoted entire articles to what the Fed meant by “considerable.”  Pundits, who apparently have the power to read minds, determined that “considerable” meant that the Fed would begin raising rates in the summer of 2015.

We missed the economics classes where the definition of “considerable” was determined to mean “10 months from now,” but apparently such classes exist, as practically every pundit agreed on the timeline.

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The Markets Need Psychotherapy

Monday, December 15th, 2014

“The whole idea that the stock market reflects fundamentals is, I think, wrong.  It really reflects psychology.  The aggregate stock market reflects psychology more than fundamentals.”

Robert Shiller, Nobel Prize-winning economist

Tired of low returns?  You may be a bond investor.

Bond investors have been “growing tired of low returns, the endless warnings that rates are about to rise, and constant reminders of the dangers of riskier bonds,” according to Jeffrey Matthias, CFA, CIPM of Madison Investment Advisors.

At the same time, they’ve watched the stock market continue to break new records every time there’s another sign that a central bank somewhere may buy a few bonds or lower interest rates into negative territory.

“None of us have ever lived through this kind of extreme, long-lasting suppressed rate environment,” Matthias wrote, and, as a result, those bond investors who are mad-as-hell-and-are-not-going-to-take-it-anymore have been frustrated enough to take on a lot more risk for a little more yield. Central Bank Assets

When you chase yield, you catch risk.  It’s a dangerous reaction to the yin and yang of investing – fear and greed.

“Typically, when markets are moving higher,” Matthias wrote, “most investors turn greedy and want more.  Should an investor’s more conservatively positioned portfolio produce lower returns when the market surges, the investor may regret not having taken more risk.  In contrast, should a riskier portfolio drop significantly in market value, the opposite may happen and an investor may begin to regret (his or her) decision to have invested in risker assets.  This can be accompanied by a fearful overreaction.”

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Satan Is a High-Frequency Trader

Friday, October 10th, 2014

Satan is now firmly in control of the markets.

No, we’re not talking about Ben Bernanke, aka Edward Quince.  His time has passed.  We’re talking about a high-frequency trader who also happens to be hell’s CEO.

satanAs evidence, consider Thursday’s market plunge.  The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) fell 334.97 points, its largest loss of the year.  The drop took place, as Zerohedge noted, after “ ‘someone’ canceled-and-replaced orders for 666 contracts 26 times in the 1130ET to 1200ET period,” after which “selling accelerated lower, no reversal, to close at the lows on heavy volume.”

The number 666 is, of course, the winning number in hell’s lottery.  To trade 666 contracts 26 times, you need a lot of capital in your account.  Most traders would avoid using the devil’s number, but someone – or, more likely, some firm – was trying to make a statement.

What could it mean?  That Satan is in charge, of course.

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It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World

Friday, August 8th, 2014

Isn’t summer supposed to be the time when life slows down and the world takes a vacation?

That may be the case for some of us, but the despots of the world are working overtime.  Consider just a few of the world crises taking place this summer:

  • Russia’s conflict with Ukraine continues.  The downing of Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 by pro-Russian rebels has done little to stop it.
  • Hamas is fighting with Israel over Gaza.  A cease fire is in place, but Hamas has shown little respect for previous cease fires and it is unlikely that this crisis has ended.
  • Muslim terrorists known as ISIS are making inroads in Iraq.  It’s reached the point where President Obama has reversed his policy and announced that U.S. military airstrikes will take place “if necessary.”
  • Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad continues to slaughter his people, while the country’s conflict threatens to spill over into Lebanon.
  • The newly inaugurated Libyan parliament has called for a cease fire and threatened to act against warring militias that continue fighting.
  • Al-Qaeda-linked sect Boko Haram continues to hold more than 200 schoolgirls captive in Nigeria.
  • Iran is developing nuclear weapons, although the U.S. State Department said U.S. and Iranian officials had a “constructive discussion” this week about Iran’s nuclear program.  There’s some conjecture that, even if Iran were to agree to halt its nuclear development program, it could outsource the program to North Korea.

    Gaza today.

    Gaza today.

Remember the end of the Cold War, the resulting “peace dividend” and the economic growth of the ’90s?  Remember life before the financial crisis?  Much has happened since then and most of it has not been good.

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Bad News – The Economy May be Recovering

Friday, August 1st, 2014

“This is what it sounds like when doves cry.”

                                                                    Prince

Imagine this.  After more than five years of mediocre economic growth and a quarter of “negative growth,” the economy grew at a rate of 4.0% in the second quarter.

At least that’s what the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) said.  The BEA previously estimated that the economy shrank by 2.9% during the first quarter, but has readjusted its analysis and now says that the economy shrank by 2.1% in the first quarter.Inventory

From 2.9% “negative growth” to 4.0% positive growth is a swing of nearly 7% in a span of just three months.

That’s quite a swing … but do you believe it?  After all, Q1 growth was reported at -1%, -2.9% and finally -2.1%, so how much confidence should we have in the BEA’s first report for Q2?

Meteorologists are often criticized for erring on the weather, but they’re forecasting.  The BEA is trying to tell us what happened more than a month ago – and still can’t get it right.

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The Fed Goes Long

Friday, April 18th, 2014

Few investors today would consider investing in long-term Treasury bonds.

The yield curve, which measures the spread between interest rates for short-term and long-term bonds, is not as flat as it has been in recent years, but that’s faint hope for investors.

A 10-year Treasury is still yielding less than 3% interest.  If the Federal Reserve Board achieves its goal of pushing inflation up to 2%, the real interest on a 10-year bond purchased today will be under 1%, payable at maturity.yield-curve-investwithalex

If the Fed overshoots its goal and inflation moves higher, which is highly likely, a 10-year bond would produce a negative yield.  What’s the probability that inflation will remain lower that the current yield on a 10-year Treasury over that entire period?

The U.S. has not had a period when inflation remained below 3% for a 10-year period since the days of the Great Depression.  During the period of recession then slow growth that we’ve experienced since the financial crisis began in 2008, inflation has remained low and the Fed’s focus has been on fighting deflation.  But when the economy improves and normal growth returns, inflation is likely to move significantly higher, as higher inflation is a byproduct of a healthy economy.

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Shining a Light on Dark Pools

Friday, April 11th, 2014

“Unless there are some changes, there’s going to be a massive crash, a flash crash times ten.”                                            Ron Morgan and Brian Levine, Goldman Sachs

As recently as 2005, dark pools made up 3% to 5% of trading activity.  Today, it’s 12%.

Dark pools are like fraternal clubs, but without the secret handshake.  No one talks about them, so they’re a mystery to the world at large.  Many were unfamiliar with dark pools until this past week, when The Wall Street Journal announced that Goldman Sachs is planning to close its Sigma X dark pool, which is one of the industry’s largest and darkest pools.  (Goldman has not confirmed that action.)Dark Pools 2

So what is a dark pool?  It’s a stock exchange where trading takes place in the “dark,” which means the size and price of orders are not revealed to other participants.

To some extent, dark pools are a reaction to high-frequency trading (HFT), which we discussed last week and in other previous posts.  When trades take place in the dark, algorithmic traders can’t take advantage of them.

Theoretically, if dark trades, which are typically high volume trades, took place in the light of day, high-frequency traders would amplify the impact of such trades and potentially cause another flash crash.  Or worse.

But on Wall Street, of course, nothing is ever that simple.  There’s more to dark pools than that.  Consider some of the questions that dark pools raise:

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