Archive for the ‘Forward Guidance’ Category

Patience Pays Off for Fed, Investors

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

The new word is “patient.”  And it’s a humdinger.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average soared more than 700 points over two days last week after Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen announced that the Fed will be “patient” about ending its easy money stance. DJIA

It took three months of hard work for the Fed to come up with the new word, but apparently it was time well spent.

In September, as we’ve reported, the Fed announced that it would wait a “considerable time” before raising interest rates.  That caused much fretting.  Media such as The New York Times devoted entire articles to what the Fed meant by “considerable.”  Pundits, who apparently have the power to read minds, determined that “considerable” meant that the Fed would begin raising rates in the summer of 2015.

We missed the economics classes where the definition of “considerable” was determined to mean “10 months from now,” but apparently such classes exist, as practically every pundit agreed on the timeline.

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Going Prudential In a Macro Way

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

Obfuscation is an art form in which the Federal Reserve Board excels.  It follows a few simple rules:

  • Never use a word or phrase that is simple and widely understood when a word is available that is less well known (e.g., “obfuscation” instead of “confusion”).
  • Act as though you know what you’re talking about.
  • Act as though everyone else knows what you’re talking about.
  • Ignore failure and act as though you’ve succeeded.  No one will know the difference.

The Fed’s expertise in obfuscation is clear in its choice of strategies that are allegedly designed to create economic growth, but are really designed to prop up the bloated stock market.Janet Yellen

First, we had “quantitative easing.”  The Fed couldn’t just call it bond buying.  What does “quantitative easing” mean?  Is it the opposite of qualitative easing?  Or quantitative hardening?  How does one go about easing quantitatively?  What exactly is being eased?

The Fed couldn’t just reduce its bond buying – it had to “taper” its bond purchases.

The Fed also flirted with “forward guidance,” which, as we’ve previously explained, is simply talking about what you’re going to do without doing it.  Mario Draghi, chair of the European Central Bank has perfected this technique.  Too bad The Fed hasn’t, because it could have avoided buying trillions of dollars in bonds it will soon have to sell. (more…)

Mario the Magnificent

Friday, June 6th, 2014

It will take more than higher prices to cure what ails the European economy, but Wall Street reacted to the European Central Bank’s inflation-boosting efforts by setting new records yesterday.

Action by the ECB has been widely anticipated since last month, when ECB President Mario Draghi announced that the ECB would be “comfortable acting” at this month’s meeting.  With a report this week that Eurozone inflation was just 0.5%, action by the ECB was all but certain.  The ECB’s target rate of inflation is just under 2%.

Mario Draghi

Mario Draghi

Anticipation of ECB action has been helping to prop up the U.S. market at a time when the Federal Reserve Board is winding down its quantitative easing program by reducing its purchase of bonds by $10 billion per month.  Apparently, as long as someone is following easy money policies, the markets are happy.

The actions announced by ECB President Mario Draghi did not include bond buying (although there are no Eurozone bonds).  That’s in keeping with previous actions by Draghi, who previously relied on “forward guidance” to boost European markets and achieve monetary goals.

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Talking the Talk

Friday, May 9th, 2014

When’s the last time you’ve heard anything about the sovereign debt crisis?

We’ve seen more activity in a tortoise than we’ve seen in Europe of late.  Maybe Vladimir Putin needs to invade Europe just to see if the cultured continent is still functioning.

Europe, though, has been quietly going about its business in much the same way as the U.S.  Bond yields have been at record lows and stock prices have been near record highs across the continent.  But, as in the U.S., just because the market is performing well, it doesn’t mean the economy is performing well.

The jobless rate in Greece is 26.7% and Spain is not far behind at 25.3%.  Overall, unemployment is at 11.8%.  In comparison, the U.S. rate is 6.3% … although the U-6 rate remains at 12.3%.Europe

Forward Guidance in Europe

Seemingly, the difference between Europe’s approach and the U.S. approach has been Europe’s reliance on forward guidance, which to date has propped up Europe’s markets.

There was talk about relying on forward guidance in the U.S. last year, but instead the Federal Reserve Board continued to buy bonds.  Talk about forward guidance is ironic, given that forward guidance is simply the act of talking … saying what you expect to do without actually doing much of anything.

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At The Fed, Saying Trumps Doing

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

President Obama’s campaign slogan for last year’s election was “Forward.”  The Federal Reserve Board’s slogan in the coming months may be “forward guidance.”

According to Goldman Sachs, The Fed is expected to begin tapering its bond buying in September, but will place more of an emphasis on “forward guidance.”

So what exactly is “forward guidance?”  Here’s how The Fed defines it:Goldman 1

“Through ‘forward guidance,’ the Federal Open Market Committee provides an indication to households, businesses, and investors about the stance of monetary policy expected to prevail in the future.  By providing information about how long the Committee expects to keep the target for the federal funds rate exceptionally low, the forward guidance language can put downward pressure on longer-term interest rates and thereby lower the cost of credit for households and businesses, and also help improve broader financial conditions.”

In other words, it’s pontificating and predicting.

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