Archive for the ‘Household Income’ Category

The Economy Is Booming – For the Repo Man

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

“Credit is a sacred trust, it’s what our free society is founded on. Do you think they give a damn about their bills in Russia?”                                                                                                                                                 Bud in “Repo Man”

The good news for the economy is that consumers are buying more.  The bad news is that they’re not paying for what they buy.

The Urban Institute found that more than a third of Americans are not only in debt, but are being chased down by debt collectors.  Debt collectors are, of course, a last resort; they’re used when all else fails and the debtor is more than 180 days past due.  When a consumer goes six months without paying a bill, it’s a good sign the person either has no intention of paying or is unable to pay.

Yet about 77 million Americans – 35% of adults with a credit file – have debt in collections.  They owe an average of $5,178, which doesn’t sound like much, but keep in mind that’s debt that’s gone into collection, not total household debt.  It does not include mortgage debt, but does include credit card, medical and utility debt.

Consumer creditThe average American household has $15,480 in credit card debt alone and consumer debt totals $11.74 trillion.  Add in federal debt, corporate debt, state government debt, municipal debt and the debt of other countries and it’s a wonder that anyone anywhere is still solvent.

You may recall the cheering that took place in 2009, when consumer debt levels decreased.  But, as the chart shows, that was a small mogul on a steep and steadily rising mountain of IOUs.

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Household Income Shows Troubling Outcome

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

Hold off on the victory dance.

The 2014 “Economic Report of the President” and many media reports indicate that the U.S. economy has finally recovered.  But has it?

One measure of economic health is household income.

Historically, America has prospered, as each generation typically has earned more inflation-adjusted income than the generation that preceded it.  The American Dream is not just to succeed yourself, but to provide your children with a better life.

A better life means more than money, of course, but money enables the next generation to do more, live more comfortably and worry less about making the mortgage payments.  Materialistic though it may be, it’s part of the American Dream.

So it’s alarming to see the drop in income that has taken place since 2007, when the financial crisis began.  Median household income has dropped from $56,000 to $51,017, which is a dip of nearly 10%.

We’ve had dips before, as the chart below shows, particularly during the “stagflation” years of the late ’70s and early ’80s.  But this has been the most dramatic drop in income in recent history.

Household Income

Household Income

When household income shrinks, some in the middle class risk sinking down to the lower class and those on the cusp of becoming middle class no longer are able to achieve that status.  As the lower class grows, government expenditures grow, resulting in higher taxes and even further erosion of discretionary income for those in the middle class.

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