Archive for January, 2014

Solving Our Problems By Executive Order

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Why didn’t he think of this sooner?

President Obama announced during this week’s State of the Union address that he is going to bypass Congress and issue more executive orders during the last three years of his presidency.

You might think that sounds like a dictatorship. After all, our government was formed around a foundation of checks and balances, with Congress and the judicial branch of government keeping the President from acting on his own. He’s not a king, a tyrant or a despot. He’s president of a democratic republic, not a banana republic.Obama

But think about it. We’ve been waiting for years for Congress to handle tough issues like immigration reform, tax reform, Social Security reform, Medicare reform, trade reform and budget reform. Nothing ever happens. When Congress does handle tough issues, we end up with laws that run more than 2,000+ pages long, that no one understands and that bear little resemblance to their original intent.

Do we really want another Affordable Care Act or another Dodd-Frank Consumer Protection Act? Do we really want all of those milquetoast compromises? And what about the billions in pork that have to be added to even the most basic bill before Congress approves it?

(more…)

We Told You So

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Sometimes the best investment advice is to do the opposite of what everyone else is doing.

When the stock market was in free fall during the financial crisis, many investors who had hung on for as long as they could take it finally gave up and sold their stocks, locking in huge losses and missing out on a historic rally.

Last summer, with the first hint that the Federal Reserve Board would be tapering its bond purchases, interest rates began to rise and investors sold bonds in record numbers.  In many cases, investors moved more money into stocks, as the market continued to set records throughout 2013 after a brief drop that was fueled by taper talk. Bond Chart

That’s proven to be a mistake, as bonds have so far outperformed stocks in 2014.  In fact, 10-year Treasuries have outperformed the S&P 500 by about 620 basis points.

We’ve suggested that investors not give up on bonds and likewise suggested that gold may shine again, in spite of its tarnished 2013 performance.  Recent trends suggest that it’s worth repeating this advice.

(more…)

No Records This Month

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Markets go up and markets go down, so maybe it’s not surprising that January’s stock market performance has less exuberance to it than the performance to which we’ve become accustomed.

As of yesterday’s market close, the S&P 500 was down 0.13% year to date, which is not a big deal, especially considering that the S&P 500 Index finished 2013 up 32.4%.  Even with the recent downward trend, the S&P 500 is up 25.35% for the past 12-month period.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average has been a bit creakier, down 0.96% year to date, but still up 21.51% for the past year.

It’s doubtful, then, that the markets will break any records this month.  But if you believe the hype, good things are headed our way.  The unemployment rate has slimmed down to 6.7%, gross domestic product (GDP) was revised upward to 3.6% for the third quarter of 2013 and, with Janet Yellen’s appointment to head the Federal Reserve Board, quantitative easing can continue ad nausem.

So why worry?

To begin with, as we explained last week, the falling unemployment rate is an illusion.  The rate dropped only because so many people have stopped looking for work.  The number of non-working Americans exceeds 102 million, which is a record.

(more…)

Some Recovery

Friday, January 10th, 2014

The government’s stimulus programs are not working and neither are a growing number of Americans.

In October, we noted that the number of Americans not working exceeded 101 million, setting a record.  But records are made to be broken and the number today is even higher – even while the official unemployment rate continues to drop.

When we wrote in October, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that 90,609,000 Americans who are 16 or older were neither working nor looking for work.  Since then, the number has increased to 91,808,000.

LFPR
But that number doesn’t include unemployed Americans who are looking for work, which was 10.4 million in December, bringing the total number of Americans who are not working up to more than 102 million.  That’s an addition of nearly 1 million since October … during what has widely been viewed as a period of economic recovery.

The civilian labor force fell from 155.3 million to 154.9 million in December, bringing the labor participation rate down from 63.0% to a 35-year low of 62.8%.

While the BLS expected 197,000 jobs to be created in December, only 74,000 jobs were created.  That’s a miss of more than 100,000 jobs.  The BLS says inclement weather affected the number of forced part-time jobs being created.  “Forced part-time” jobs are those where a former marketing manager who has been out of work for two years runs out of money and takes a position working the deep fryer at Wendy’s because there are no other options.

(more…)

Bully for 2013 … But What About 2014?

Friday, January 3rd, 2014

2013 markets were full of bull.

The economy continued to sputter along, growing at about 2%, unemployment remained high and corporate profits were mediocre.  Yet the S&P 500 index rose a staggering 29.6%, its best performance since the go-go-days of 1997.

So what sort of bull drove this bull market?  The Federal Reserve Board’s quantitative easing (QE) program, high-frequency trading and exuberant investors who shifted into stocks with renewed confidence.

Investors Intelligence SurveyWhen Fed Chair Ben Bernanke hinted in May and June that The Fed might start pulling back on its bond buying soon, the market initially fell and interest rates rose.  But ironically, rising rates drove investors out of bonds and many invested further in stocks, pushing the market even higher.

More Bull in 2014?

As 2014 begins, the bullish sentiment continues.  More than 60% of those surveyed by Investors Intelligence are now bullish and the bull-bear ratio is at a record level of more than four.

Bullish sentiment at this level is typically a good thing, though, as high investor enthusiasm typically leads to a drop in the market.  When investors are at their most bullish, that’s when the stock market usually drops.

(more…)