Archive for June, 2015

How To Retire Early – Part One

Monday, June 29th, 2015

How would you like to retire early?  Maybe 62 is a good age or maybe you’d like to retire at 60 or even 55.

But unless you’ve won the lottery, have a government pension, or are the favorite niece or nephew of a rich uncle, you may find it difficult to achieve your goal.  If can still be done, though.  You have two options: cut your expenses or increase your retirement savings.  Better yet, do both.Retirement 1

More specifically, you should be able to take that job and shove it at an age earlier than 65 if you do the following:

Cut back on your expenses.  Even people who think they’re living frugally usually aren’t.  How often do you dine out?  Do you stop for coffee on your way to work?  What do you spend on hair stylists, clothing, manicures and pedicures?  Do you do your own landscaping and mow your own lawn?

Non-essential expenses add up.  Review everything you spend and make a cost-benefit analysis.  Determine whether the convenience and pleasure you derive from your expenses is worth the investment.  Maybe Two-Buck Chuck is no substitute for your favorite Côtes du Rhône, but would you rather drink good wine or retire early?  You may not be able to do both.  (more…)

What Yellen Should Have Said

Monday, June 22nd, 2015

The question reporters should be asking now is, what did the Federal Reserve Board’s Open Market Committee do for two days last week?

The statement it issued based on its meeting is a rehash of its last statement, which itself was not worth repeating.  Check the link from The Wall Street Journal, which you can use to compare the two most recent statements (as well as others), and you’ll see that the Fed mailed it in this time.

Yellen

These folks are managing our economy.  The fate of the world is in their hands.  And the best they can do is come up with an update to a previous statement.  No wonder the economy has practically flatlined throughout the current “recovery.”

It’s worth adding, though, that the Fed’s Seinfeld approach of having meetings about nothing may be better for the economy and for the American taxpayer than the previous chair’s pronouncements about Operation Twist and unlimited QE programs.

The latest Fed statement starts with this: “Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in January suggests that economic growth has moderated somewhat.”  Really?  What does “has moderated somewhat” mean?  And where is the “information” received from?  NSA wiretaps?  Drones?  Ben Bernanke’s blog?

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Central Bankers: Masters of the Universe

Monday, June 15th, 2015

Earlier this month, along with our usual dire observations about an economy that has come unhinged, I noted that the world was not coming to an end.  On closer inspection, I may have been wrong on that one.

One sign that all is not right in the world of investing is the increasing volatility.  Volatility is not a good thing for investors seeking to limit their risk and markets recently have been as spiked as Jonestown Kool-Aid.  The results could be nearly as disastrous. Volatility

As the chart shows, currency, oil and interest rates have been up, down and all around.  Bonds, too, have been volatile, and price shifts have been taking place with increasing frequency.

It makes me uncomfortable when I see government bonds flash crashing along with currencies of developed markets with enormous debt levels.  The Swiss National Bank’s unpegged its currency and, if Japan keeps burning yens, China is likely to unpeg its currency. When that happens, it isn’t going to be fun.

Why is this happening?  Because central bankers have become the masters of the universe.  Make that Masters of the Universe.

As Zerohedge notes, “For the last few years, valuations in more and more markets seem to have stopped following traditional relationships and instead followed global QE.  Likewise in meetings with investors, we have been struck by how little time anyone spends discussing fundamentals these days, and how much revolves around central banks.  Record-high proportions of investors think fixed income is expensive and think equities are expensive.  A growing number of property market participants seem to think real estate is expensive. And yet almost all have had to remain long, as each of these markets has rallied.  Could it be that central bank liquidity has forced investors to be the same way round more so than previously, and that this is making markets prone to sudden corrections?”  (more…)

Economic Schizophrenia

Monday, June 8th, 2015

Schizophrenia is “a long-term mental disorder of a type involving a breakdown in the relation between thought, emotion, and behavior, leading to faulty perception, inappropriate actions and feelings, withdrawal from reality and personal relationships into fantasy and delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation.”Personal Income

In general use it is referred to as “a mentality or approach characterized by inconsistent or contradictory elements.”  It is also often used to refer to someone with a split personality.

It is a truly severe mental disorder that is difficult to treat.  And it seems to be a perfect description of today’s economy.

Thursday: Don’t Raise Rates This Year

As a recent example, consider last week’s announcement by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) that it was lowering its growth estimate for the U.S. economy from 3.1% to 2.5%.  Both estimates are well below the 3.3% annual growth rate that was the norm before the financial crisis, but even 2.5% is average the average we’ve seen throughout the Obama presidency. (more…)

Stock Market Continues to Set Records, But Why?

Monday, June 1st, 2015

Let’s take a simple quiz and answer the following multiple choice question.

The stock market is hitting new highs because:

  1. Corporate earnings are at an all-time high.
  2. The economy is recovering.
  3. The market is being manipulated by the Federal Reserve Board.
  4. Investors lack common sense.

Corporate earnings are supposed to drive stock prices.  That used to be true, before the market was made dysfunctional by Fed mingling, high-frequency trading, overbearing regulations and other factors.  It’s not true anymore.  At least not now. S&P 500

The stock market has been setting records, even though S&P company earnings declined 13% in the first quarter of 2015.  That follows a 14% declined in the fourth quarter of 2014.  Do you see a trend here?

As our friend Charlie Bilello of Pension Partners, LLC pointed out on Contra Corner, six out of the ten major S&P 500 sectors showed year-over-year declines, including consumer sectors, which were supposed to have benefited most from a decline in gas prices.

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