Obamacare Resuscitated

“If you don’t buy this magazine, we’ll kill this dog.”

So said a cover of National Lampoon back in 1973. We’re reminded of the infamous cover when we reflect on the ignoble fate of the American Health Care Act (AHCA), which was meant to replace the widely disliked Affordable Care Act (ACA), aka Obamacare.National Lampoon

Republicans in Congress were faced with a similar choice last week. While the Republicans gained a majority based largely on the promise of overturning Obamacare, polls showed the AHCA was also unpopular. A Quinnipiac University poll found that only 17% of American voters approved of the AHCA, while 56% opposed it.

About one in a thousand voters knows what’s in the American Health Care Act, but given media propaganda about Americans being left to die without government-subsidized health insurance, it’s understandable why the act was unpopular.

It didn’t help that the Congressional Budget Office predicted that the proposed legislation would result in 24 million Americans lacking health insurance by 2026 (note: the CBO also predicted that, thanks to Obamacare, the individual market would enroll 26 million by this year. Instead, enrollment is just 10 million).

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The White House as Animal House

Why has the stock market been going bonkers, even as interest rates have begun to rise?

CNBC sums it up in two words: “animal spirits.” Wall Street types aren’t talking about the ghosts of dead puppies when they use the term “animal spirits.” It’s a reference to human exuberance based on expectations.

The term was a concoction of John Maynard Keynes, the guy who has been revered by liberals everywhere because of his notion that government spending is good for the economy. Of course it’s not — when government spends, we pay — but politicians, journalists, academics and even many economists who should know better like to be called neo-Keynesians, so they follow along.

Coming up with the term “animal spirits” to describe human behavior is perhaps Mr. Keynes’ second worst offense.

Any time an alleged expert makes a reference to “animal spirits,” he or she gets quoted, since it sounds like deep thinking to most journalists and at least it’s more colorful than saying “consumers are feeling more confident about the economy, because their employers are no longer being regulated into bankruptcy.”

Used in a sentence: John Canally, chief economic str

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Little Enterprise, But Plenty of Free

America’s free enterprise system was built on enterprise. Now, all that’s left is “free.” Not free, as in the freedom to work hard and prosper, but “free,” as in free money, free time, free drugs and free entitlements.

But, of course, there’s no such thing as a free lunch; when something is free for some, others have to pay for it. That would be middle-class taxpayers, of course. And yet they not only allow it to happen, they often encourage it by re-electing the same politicians and voting against real change.FF491_1

Much of the bill won’t go to today’s middle class. It will go to our children. Baby boomers, who are so into nurturing and providing the best for their kids, have stuck them and their grandchildren with a whopping bill.

Quoting Lacy Hunt, an economist with Hoisington Investment, The Wall Street Journal noted that debt in the U.S. now totals more than $69 trillion. It’s more than doubled since 2000, when Fed statisticians recorded the debt as being $30 trillion.

A doubling over more than 16 years may not seem so bad, but the economy hasn’t grown along with the debt. In 2000, debt was 294% of GDP. Today, it’s 370% of GDP. Debt will not improve the quality of life for your children as they grow and try to raise families.

Consider what’s happening.

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The Not-Working Class

In a capitalist country like ours, hard work is supposed to be rewarded and slothfulness is considered one of the seven deadly sins.

So what to make of the “quiet catastrophe,” which George Will describes as follows: “After 88 consecutive months of the economic expansion that began in June 2009, a smaller percentage of American males in the prime working years (ages 25 to 54) are working than were working near the end of the Great Depression in 1940, when the unemployment rate was above 14%. If the labor-force participation rate were as high today as it was as recently as 2000, nearly 10 million more Americans would have jobs.”Working

If even half of those 10 million men were working, the economy would be growing at a faster rate, productivity would increase and consumer spending would be higher. So why are they out of work when the economy is allegedly booming and the unemployment rate has fallen to just 4.8%?

Of the 23 affluent countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, the United States ranks 22nd, ahead of only last-place Italy, in 25-to-54 year-old male labor-force participation.

Two plausible explanations exist—and neither one is complimentary to the economic policies of former President Obama or his predecessors.

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