Ben Bernanke Invents Supply Side Keynesian Economics

Ben Bernanke is back, having been interviewed during the past month by The New York Times, NPR, CNNMoney, The Hill, Bloomberg, CNBC and other media. That his book, The Courage to Act: A Memoir of a Crisis and Its Aftermath, is out in paperback could have something to do with it.

When the hardcover version was released, Bernanke, former chair of the Federal Reserve Board, wrote a piece for The Wall Street Journal titled, “How the Fed Saved the Economy.” Having taken credit for saving the economy after the financial crisis, he’s now giving advice about how to continue saving it. His comments, in which he poses as a supply sider while advocating for still more Keynesian stimulus are almost as unintentionally humorous as his Journal op-ed.

In an interview with The Hill, he said, “What we want to do is try to improve the supply side of the economy, make it grow faster, have greater potential. And I think that probably that to do that, I would think that on the fiscal side, that infrastructure spending that improves our roads, our bridges, our schools, and tax reform, not necessarily tax cuts, but reform that makes the system simpler, more efficient, those would probably be the highest-return fiscal actions in terms of getting higher growth.”

We’re not sure how you can reform the massive federal tax code without cutting taxes for someone, but supply side stimulus spending is an oxymoron. Supply siders would deregulate and cut taxes to encourage business investment.

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Trump vs. the World

During the presidential campaign, President Trump often came off as a bully. Now that he’s president, the bullying is coming from others.

The “resistance,” the media, academics, celebrities and others have not accepted him as their president. On any given day, you’re likely to read more favorable reporting about North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un than you are about President Trump.

Granted, his statements often accentuate the negative and eliminate the positive. His tweets, at least the ones that catch the attention of journalists, are sometimes crude or unpresidential and many of his braggadocious claims, at best, exaggerate the truth.

But with 100 days gone, is the widespread criticism warranted? How is he really doing as president? And how does his presidency compare with previous presidents?

Before considering his performance to date, keep in mind that judging a president based on such a short period is like judging a corporation based on its performance for a quarter. A presidential term is 1,461 days, so the first 100 days account for about 7% of the president’s term.

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The White House as Animal House

Why has the stock market been going bonkers, even as interest rates have begun to rise?

CNBC sums it up in two words: “animal spirits.” Wall Street types aren’t talking about the ghosts of dead puppies when they use the term “animal spirits.” It’s a reference to human exuberance based on expectations.

The term was a concoction of John Maynard Keynes, the guy who has been revered by liberals everywhere because of his notion that government spending is good for the economy. Of course it’s not — when government spends, we pay — but politicians, journalists, academics and even many economists who should know better like to be called neo-Keynesians, so they follow along.

Coming up with the term “animal spirits” to describe human behavior is perhaps Mr. Keynes’ second worst offense.

Any time an alleged expert makes a reference to “animal spirits,” he or she gets quoted, since it sounds like deep thinking to most journalists and at least it’s more colorful than saying “consumers are feeling more confident about the economy, because their employers are no longer being regulated into bankruptcy.”

Used in a sentence: John Canally, chief economic str

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

For the past eight years, the Federal Reserve Board has been the primary force behind the U.S. economy. That hasn’t worked out so well.

Now President Trump is in charge of the U.S. and its economy.

Whether that will revive the economy and make America great again remains to be seen. While the Trump presidency is still brand new, we’ve already seen more action take place that will affect the economy than we saw in the past eight years.trump_cowboy_2509705

Some of what’s taking place appears to be good. Some of it appears to be bad. And some of it appears to be ugly.

The good. Already, President Trump has signed a slew of executive orders. While we’re no fan of executive orders, every president has used them to a degree–and it was one way to make a quick impact, even before his cabinet has been confirmed.

Regulation, as we have frequently noted, has paralyzed the economy, having its greatest impact on small businesses. That President Trump is serious about deregulation is clear by what he’s done to date.

One of his executive orders requires that whenever a new regulation is approved, it must be offset by “the elimination of existing costs associated with at least two prior regulations.” The order adds that the “total incremental cost of all new regulations, including repealed regulations, to be finalized this year shall be no greater than zero, unless otherwise required by law.”

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