Archive for the ‘Deflation’ Category

Brady Plot Puts U.S. Economy on Verge of Deflation

Monday, May 11th, 2015

The Federal Reserve Board – which may be the smartest deliberative body on the face of this earth – bought more than $3.5 trillion in bonds in an effort to raise the inflation rate to 2%.

It failed.  In fact, the inflation rate is lower now than it was before the bond buying began.RED CARPET AT THE MET COSTUME INSTITUTE GALA 2011

Why that is so now seems pretty obvious.  It’s Tom Brady’s fault.  We don’t know that for a fact, of course.  How can we prove it?  But, as attorney Tom Wells might put it, it’s “more probable than not.”

The hunky quarterback of The New England Patriots likely involved his wife, former supermodel Gisele Bündchen, since she’s retired now and has nothing better to do.

To again borrow the words of Wells, Brady was “at least generally aware” of the Federal Reserve Board’s attempts to increase the rate of inflation to 2% … and so he set out to thwart that attempt.  (We’re not sure how being “generally aware” differs from being “aware,” or why it needs to be modified by “at least,” but it sounds pretty ominous.)


Bazooka or Blunderbuss?

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Any day now, it seems that European Central Bank President Mario Draghi’s full head of hair will migrate to his chin and turn gray, as the central banker morphs into former Fed Chair Ben Bernanke.Bazooka 2

Last week, the ECB began its purchase of €60 billion ($64.2 billion) a month in Eurozone government bonds, with total purchases expected to eventually exceed €1 trillion.

He’s called the purchase his “big bazooka,” but it could turn out to be a blunderbuss, an antiquated weapon that’s prone to misfiring.


The Inflation Straw Man

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

 “When real interest rates start to move up, that’s when the crisis could hit.”

                                                  Alan Greenspan

So the Federal Reserve Board spent six years and boosted its bond portfolio to $4 trillion in an effort to boost the rate of inflation to 2%.

How did that go?  Not so well.

This week, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) declined 0.7% in January on a seasonally adjusted basis.  It was the third consecutive month of decline; over the past year, the “all-items index” decreased 0.1% before seasonal adjustment. CPI

In other words, the U.S. has joined Europe and is in deflation mode.  It’s the first time the CPI hit negative territory for the year since the beginning of the financial crisis in 2009.  Imagine how low prices would be if the Fed didn’t buy all those bonds!

That dropping oil prices caused U.S. deflation underscores the foolishness of the Fed fantasy about a 2% inflation rate.

As David Stockman’s Contra Corner put it, “the CPI measure of inflation is so distorted by imputations, geometric means, hedonic adjustments and numerous other artifices, that targeting to 2% versus 1% or even a zero rate of short-term measured consumer price inflation is a completely arbitrary, unreliable and unachievable undertaking. Yet, (Fed Chair Janet) Yellen’s latest exercise in monetary pettifoggery is apparently driven by just that purpose … ”


The United States of Europe

Monday, January 26th, 2015

The U.S. has been imitating Europe for years, boosting government spending and racking up debt, creating a healthcare system that doesn’t work and adding costly new social benefits.

Now it’s Europe’s turn to imitate the U.S.  As expected, European Central Bank head Mario Draghi announced a quantitative easing (QE) program for Europe last week.

Does this look like deflation to you?

Does this look like deflation to you?

Over the past six years, the U.S. Federal Reserve Board’s three QE programs boosted the Fed’s balance sheet from less than $1 trillion to $4.48 trillion.  In comparison, the ECB’s QE program is modest; the ECB will purchase $1.24 trillion of existing sovereign bonds and debt securities over the next 18 months.

But any QE program would be modest in comparison with the Fed’s.  And, long term, maybe the first round of QE doesn’t work, the ECB will continue to imitate the U.S. and follow with additional rounds of bond buying.

The ECB’s action raises a few questions:

If Draghi believes that bond buying is going to help Europe, why hasn’t he tried it before now?  The ECB has tried everything but QE, but primarily relied on forward guidance, which amounts to talking about the economy.  Forward guidance would be an absurd economic policy anywhere, but in a central bank – but not as absurd as QE.  Forward guidance also doesn’t require the purchase of trillions of dollars’ worth of assets. (more…)

It “Eats Societies Alive”

Monday, January 5th, 2015

“Oh, no!” you’ve probably been thinking.  “The cost of filling my gas tank dropped again!”

Falling prices are a good thing for the cash-strapped American consumer, whose income on-average has fallen to where it was in 1994, as we’ve reported.  But behind every silver lining, there’s a black cloud and leave it to us to find it. Deflation

Deflation is typically a sign that all is not well with the economy.  Prices drop when the economy is so weak that consumer demand drops.  When prices drop, profits decrease, stock prices drop, and unemployment and bankruptcies increase.  Consumers put off purchases and wait for prices to fall further, which contributes to even further deflation.  Deflation was an issue during the Great Depression and every period of deflation has been accompanied by a recession.

Raúl Ilargi Meijer of The Automatic Earth says deflation “eats societies alive,” explaining that “Deflation is not lower prices. Deflation is people not spending, then stores lowering their prices because nobody’s buying, then companies firing their employees, and then going broke. Rinse and repeat. Less spending leads to lower prices leads to more unemployment leads to less spending power.”


What’s So Funny About Quantitative Easing?

Thursday, February 10th, 2011

There’s plenty funny about quantitative easing. This UTube computer-animated video explains QE2 much better than anything I’ve seen or read elsewhere. Check it out.