Archive for December, 2014

Do You Believe in Santa Claus? You May Be A Keynesian.

Monday, December 29th, 2014

The Christmas season is an appropriate time to reflect on Keynesian economics, given this: believing in Keynesian economics is a lot like believing in Santa Claus.

Most Americans grow up believing some chubby guy in a red suit has the stamina to deliver gifts worldwide to billions of people in a single night.  Young children, by their nature, are self-absorbed and gullible enough to think that Santa knows how they behaved throughout the year and will deliver presents accordingly. Santa Keynes 2

Most of us grow up and realize that reindeer can’t fly, Santa would freeze to death in the North Pole and his elves would unionize.

But not everyone outgrows gullibility.  Some become Keynesian economists.  As Keynesians, they don’t quite understand unemployment, because they never experience it – there is plenty of demand for Keynesians, who can find jobs working for the government, in academia or as journalists.

Keynesians believe that increased government spending (aka “aggregate demand”) stimulates the economy and money can be handed out, like Christmas presents, with only positive consequences.  They even believe that a dollar spent by the government results in many dollars being spent throughout the economy (the “Keynesian multiplier”).  Since they believe there is a Santa Claus, they give little thought to the reality that someone, somewhere has to pay for this largesse.

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Patience Pays Off for Fed, Investors

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

The new word is “patient.”  And it’s a humdinger.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average soared more than 700 points over two days last week after Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen announced that the Fed will be “patient” about ending its easy money stance. DJIA

It took three months of hard work for the Fed to come up with the new word, but apparently it was time well spent.

In September, as we’ve reported, the Fed announced that it would wait a “considerable time” before raising interest rates.  That caused much fretting.  Media such as The New York Times devoted entire articles to what the Fed meant by “considerable.”  Pundits, who apparently have the power to read minds, determined that “considerable” meant that the Fed would begin raising rates in the summer of 2015.

We missed the economics classes where the definition of “considerable” was determined to mean “10 months from now,” but apparently such classes exist, as practically every pundit agreed on the timeline.

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The Markets Need Psychotherapy

Monday, December 15th, 2014

“The whole idea that the stock market reflects fundamentals is, I think, wrong.  It really reflects psychology.  The aggregate stock market reflects psychology more than fundamentals.”

Robert Shiller, Nobel Prize-winning economist

Tired of low returns?  You may be a bond investor.

Bond investors have been “growing tired of low returns, the endless warnings that rates are about to rise, and constant reminders of the dangers of riskier bonds,” according to Jeffrey Matthias, CFA, CIPM of Madison Investment Advisors.

At the same time, they’ve watched the stock market continue to break new records every time there’s another sign that a central bank somewhere may buy a few bonds or lower interest rates into negative territory.

“None of us have ever lived through this kind of extreme, long-lasting suppressed rate environment,” Matthias wrote, and, as a result, those bond investors who are mad-as-hell-and-are-not-going-to-take-it-anymore have been frustrated enough to take on a lot more risk for a little more yield. Central Bank Assets

When you chase yield, you catch risk.  It’s a dangerous reaction to the yin and yang of investing – fear and greed.

“Typically, when markets are moving higher,” Matthias wrote, “most investors turn greedy and want more.  Should an investor’s more conservatively positioned portfolio produce lower returns when the market surges, the investor may regret not having taken more risk.  In contrast, should a riskier portfolio drop significantly in market value, the opposite may happen and an investor may begin to regret (his or her) decision to have invested in risker assets.  This can be accompanied by a fearful overreaction.”

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Inflation Is Too Low? Tell That To American Consumers.

Monday, December 8th, 2014

We’ve explained in the past how the federal government puts a yellow smiley face on its unemployment figures by excluding Americans who have given up looking for work and including part-time workers as if they are fully employed.

Similarly, the Congressional Budget Office estimates the cost of a tax increase or tax reduction under the assumption that the increase will have no impact on taxpayer behavior – so tax cuts have no economic benefit and tax increases produce revenue without harming the economy.CPI

So we shouldn’t be surprised that the Consumer Price Index (CPI), which measures inflation, rigs the numbers by excluding increases in the cost of food and energy.

The Federal Reserve Board’s $3.5 trillion in bond buying failed to boost inflation to the target rate of 2%, but the Fed could have accomplished its goal without buying a single bond.  All it had to do was change the method used for calculating CPI.

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Give Us Back Our Gold!

Monday, December 1st, 2014

“This is gold, Mr. Bond.  All my life I’ve been in love with its color … its brilliance, its divine heaviness.”

                                                   Auric Goldfinger

Gold prices recently hit a four-year low, while stock prices seem to hit a new record almost weekly.  So which is the better investment today?

Before answering that question, consider the latest worldwide trend.  “Repatriating” gold is becoming as fashionable as quantitative easing and stimulus spending.

Germany’s central bank started the trend last year with its decision to return some of the country’s gold home from vaults in the U.S. and Paris.  It was followed by a campaign called “Bring Our Gold Back Home,” but Germany has since backed off on plans to repatriate more gold.Gold Prices

Netherlands has already moved 122 tons of gold back home.  And Switzerland voted yesterday on its “Save Our Swiss Gold” initiative, which would force the Swiss National Bank to buy gold every time it buys euros, which it has done to curb the rise of the Swiss franc.

If the initiative were to pass, Zerohedge noted, “it will undoubtedly set off alarm bells throughout the gold market, as yet more physical gold will need to be repatriated and another sizeable, price-insensitive buyer will enter the marketplace.”

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