Posts Tagged ‘Recovery’

The Peter Pan Economy

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

Lowering interest rates is not necessarily a bad thing. It can make borrowing cheaper, which – at least in theory – will stimulate business investment. It can weaken the dollar, making American goods cheaper abroad. It can lower payments on the federal debt.

The problem with lowering interest rates is that eventually they have to be raised again. If rates were to remain at zero indefinitely, the Federal Reserve Board could not lower them to stimulate the economy during a recession, unless it created negative interest rates, which cause a whole new set of economic problems.

And history says a recession is likely to come sometime soon. The current recovery, which has frequently been described as anemic, celebrated its eighth anniversary in June. Now in its 97th month, it is the third longest recovery on record. The average recovery since the end of World War II has been 58 to 61 months.

While the length of the recovery may not determine how long a recovery will last, when unemployment drops low enough to spur inflation, the probability of a recession climbs. And unemployment is allegedly at a 16-year low of 4.3%.

“Expansions, like Peter Pan, endure but never seem to grow old,” according to Fed economist Glenn Rudebusch.

But the current expansion has much more in common with Peter Pan. It’s a fairy tale. And the Fed has run out of fairy dust.

The Fed’s Conundrum

The conundrum the Fed faces is that as it raises interest rates so that it will be able to drop them in case of a recession, it may actually cause one. (more…)

Nothing Lasts Forever

Monday, December 14th, 2015

If the Federal Reserve Board has used all of its policy tools during the current expansion, what happens when there’s a recession?

That’s a question worth asking, even as the Fed appears ready to raise interest rates, albeit by just a smidgen, based on the pretext that ZIRP (zero interest rate policy) is no longer needed, given today’s allegedly booming economy.

On course, the economy’s not booming and we may even be heading into a recession, assuming we aren’t already in one (it’s hard to tell in today’s slow growth-no growth economy). Average Recovery

Just one sign that the boom is an illusion is the length of the current expansion.  The average recovery since the end of World War II has been 58 to 61 months, depending on whose numbers you use.  The current “recovery” hit the 58-month milestone in April 2014 – 20 months ago. As David Stockman pointed out this week in his “Contra Corner” blog, “the only expansion that was appreciably longer than the present tepid affair was the 119 month stretch of the 1990s.”

Nothing lasts forever and even Larry Summers, the former Treasury secretary and current Harvard professor, recognizes that the current expansion may be nearing an end. As he wrote last week in a Washington Post op-ed, “U.S. and international experience suggests that once a recovery is mature, the odds that it will end within two years are about half and that it will end in less than three years are over two-thirds.  Because normal growth is now below 2 percent rather than near 3 percent, as has been the case historically, the risk may even be greater now.”

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Polar Vortex or Recession Redux?

Friday, May 30th, 2014

The recovery that wasn’t a recovery may have come to an end, as the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported that gross domestic product dropped by 1% during the first quarter of 2014.

Even with the drop in GDP, lower housing sales and continued high unemployment, no one is saying the economic is in a recession.  Perhaps when a recovery is as insignificant as the one we’ve experienced for nearly five years, the distinction between recession and recovery is insignificant.

The economy was in sad shape five years ago and it’s in sad shape today, in spite of record stimulus spending, bond buying, and warm and fuzzy messages from the President, Congress and the Fed.

Quarter-to-Quarter-Changes-in-Real-GDP-Percent-Change_chartbuilder-1But fear not.  The bar is so low now, even a baby step over it will look like a high jump.  At least that’s the opinion of PNC Chief Economist Stuart Hoffman who wrote, “I believe this real GDP decline, mostly due to the polar vortex, coiled the ‘economic spring’ even tighter for a sharp snap-back (boing!) this quarter, where I have an above-consensus forecast for a 4.0% annualized rise in real GDP.”

In other words, bad news for the first quarter is good news for the second quarter.  Stop me if you’ve heard that story before.

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Wishful Thinking Does Not Create Economic Recovery

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

This was going to be the year.  Remember the predictions of 3% economic growth?

More recently, the consensus was 1.2% growth for the most recent quarter.

It turns out, though, that the economy has flat-lined, growing at a puny 0.1%, quarter over quarter.  Even the 2% growth we’ve experienced throughout the 58 months of economic recovery we’ve had (see last week’s post) looks good in comparison to what we’re experiencing.GDP

Keynesians, undaunted by being wrong 100% of the time, have been predicting for years that prosperity is just around the corner.  The only thing around the corner, though, has been another corner, then another.  It’s time to realize that we’ve been going in circles.

Growth of 0.1% is, of course, just a whisker’s width away from recession.  Maybe that’s what’s around the corner.

Two areas of weakness were trade, which subtracted 80 basis points from GDP growth, and inventories, which subtracted 60 basis points.  You may recall that in Q4 of 2013, when economists were talking about strengthening growth, it was because inventories were increasing.

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The Economic Recovery That No One Noticed

Friday, April 25th, 2014

The average recovery since the end of World War II has been 58 months.  The current “recovery” has just reached that milestone.

So maybe we should be celebrating.  But what’s to celebrate?econ_expansion25_405

If you were to define “recovery” as a period when gross domestic project (GDP) increases from one quarter to the next, yes, we’ve been in a recovery.  But a recovery is typically reflected by a period that also includes, among other things, low unemployment, strong consumer spending, increasing income, higher inflation and strong manufacturing.

Most of those signs of recovery have been either barely visible or missing, and GDP has been growing about as fast as a bonsai tree.

This has been, and will likely continue to be, the recovery that no one noticed.  It’s a recovery in name only, as for most Americans it doesn’t feel much different than a recession.  Consider what’s been happening:

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The Unnoticed Recovery

Friday, July 26th, 2013

It seems that every day we hear about a stronger economy with real jobs, a recovered housing market and renewed manufacturing strength being just ahead.

We hear about it.  We just don’t see it.

The economy’s been growing for four years now, yet its growth has been so stunted, most of the country still thinks we’re in a recession.  The McClatchy-Marist Poll this week found that 54% of adult Americans think the U.S. in still in a recession, while only 38% think it’s not.

In an economy with a 7.6% unemployment rate (but really more than 14%), any sign of improvement is good news, so we can be thankful that the number of people who think we’re still in a recession is down from 63% in March and 75% in 2011.

Only 29% of those surveyed think their family finances will improve in the coming year, while 19% think they will worsen.  More than half think they will remain the same.

Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion, treats the poll results as good news and notes that “President Obama plans to refocus his second term agenda on the economy.”

Well, that should save the day.  Except that a separate poll finds that Americans have little faith in their political leaders.

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