Posts Tagged ‘Budget Deficit’

Is This Any Way to Run a Country?

Monday, April 27th, 2015

For as long as any of us has been alive, America has had a better way.

Our free market economy, complemented by the freedoms documented in our Bill of Rights, have combined to make America the envy of the world.  Our economic strength has also translated into an ability to spread freedom in other parts of the world.  Based on the strength of our principles, our economy, our people and our leadership, America won the Cold War without firing a shot.

But what’s happening today? Obama

Growth is taking place at a glacial place, debt is out of control, incomes are down and unemployment has been chronically high.

“Compared with the average postwar recovery, the economy in the past six years has created 12.1 million fewer jobs and $6,175 less income on average for every man, woman and child in the country,” former U.S. Senator Phil Gramm wrote last week in The Wall Street Journal.  “Had this recovery been as strong as previous postwar recoveries, some 1.6 million more Americans would have been lifted out of poverty and middle-income families would have a stunning $11,629 more annual income. At the present rate of growth in per capita GDP, it will take another 31 years for this recovery to match the per capita income growth already achieved at this point in previous postwar recoveries.” (more…)

Why Worry About Climate Change When You’re $18 Trillion in Debt?

Monday, April 13th, 2015

Which crisis scares you more – climate change or our growing debt?

Climate change certainly receives a lot more attention in the media and a lot more attention from politicians, even if they’ve done little about it.

Last week, as one small example, President Obama said in an interview that his push to address climate change was influenced by an asthma attack his daughter Malia had when she was a four-year-old.  Asthma is a medical condition that has no connection to climate change.  It would be as logical to suggest that climate change cured her asthma, since she no longer has it and the climate has continued to deteriorate since she was four. National Debt and Interest 1 Wallace

We’re not suggesting that climate change doesn’t merit serious attention, but even if it’s as big a deal as environmental activists would have us believe, the U.S. is going to have little impact unless China, India and other ozone-busters get on board, too.

Debt, though, which President Obama and most members of Congress rarely talk about, just keeps rolling along.  (more…)

AP Poll: Americans Want Less Economic Growth

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

Well, here’s a shocker.  A new AP poll shows that a majority of Americans want a higher minimum wage.  They also want paid sick leave and parental leave, free community college and more gender equality laws.  And, of course, they want wealthy taxpayers to pay for all of it.

Who wouldn’t?  The poll doesn’t ask about the resulting economic impact of these feel-good policies.

Polls are supposed to be objective.  They rarely are.  Asking Americans if they support a higher minimum wage isn’t too far removed from asking, “Do you want to help poor people?” Transfer Payments

Pollsters will never ask questions such as, “Studies show that increasing the minimum wage results in fewer jobs and slower economic growth.  Do you favor an increase in the minimum wage?”

The Poll That Will Never Be

To provide some balance, perhaps AP should poll Americans about the following questions.

Do you favor higher unemployment and lower economic growth?

It’s basic economics that when the price of something goes up, demand falls.  Increasing the minimum wage, and requiring paid sick leave and parental leave may be desirable for employees, but many would lose their jobs as a result.


Too Much Interest in Interest Rates

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

There has been much market panic of late over the possibility that the Federal Reserve Board will be raising interest rates sometime in the not-too-distant future.

Small cap stocks were the first casualty.  As September ended, the S&P 500 was still up 7.3% for the year, while the Russell 2000 was down 3.8% and off 7.4% from its high in July.  Even after being up more than 40% year-over-year at the end of December, the Russell 2000 was negative year-over-year on Wednesday before having its best day in six weeks on Thursday. 

As The Wall Street Journal explained, “Given that periods of market turmoil tend to buffet small stocks more than their larger counterparts, many investors in small companies are fearful as the Federal Reserve moves toward raising interest rates.  Even investors hopeful for small stocks are proceeding with caution.”

But should the markets be this skittish over interest rates?

In September, Fed Chair Janet Yellen announced that interest rates will remain low for “a considerable time” even after quantitative easing (QE), the Fed’s bond-buying program, ends.  QE is scheduled to end this month, but could be extended.

Economic data continues to be mixed.  The official U-3 unemployment rate dropped to 5.9%, but the percentage of Americans participating in the workforce is at a 36 year low.  Jobs are increasing, but four out of five of them are for low or minimum wages.  So QE could be extended, since its alleged purpose is to help the economy grow.

Even if QE ends this month, the “considerable time” Ms. Yellen cites could, indeed, be considerable, given the consequences of raising interest rates.


Only a Half Trillion Dollars

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

It’s a sign of how much trouble we’re in when a budget deficit of a half trillion dollars seems like fiscal restraint.

It is progress, given that annual budget deficits were running above $1 trillion a year throughout President Obama’s first term and have been as high as $1.4 trillion.  And it could have been worse.  Recall the effort made by President Obama to stop the automatic spending cuts that took place when sequestration was adopted.

But a half trillion dollars is still a mountain of money.  It helps to give the number some context.CBO Chart

To reach a half trillion dollars, you would have to spend $8 per second beginning with the year 0 and continue spending through today.  If you had a stack of $1 bills adding up to $500 billion and were able to put them one on top of another, the stack would be 34,000 miles high.


No, We Can’t

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

Someone had blunder’d:
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die.

                                          From “The Charge of the Light       Brigade”

Take pity on the can.  It’s been kicked so far down the road, it could circle the globe a dozen times.  It’s been battered more than the New England Patriots’ starting lineup.  It’s been kicked harder than an Adam Vinatieri football.

And still it persists.

This week, Congress and President Obama reached a deal that reopens the government through January 15 and suspends the debt ceiling through February 7.  Calling it a deal, though, is an exaggeration.  One side, the Democrats, refused to negotiate.  The other side, the Republicans, asked for something it had no hope of getting.  So everyone agreed to kick the can three months down the

Beyond that, according to The Wall Street Journal, “The bill includes one minor change to the health law sought by Republicans, setting new procedures to verify the incomes of some people receiving government subsidies for health-insurance costs.  It also provides back pay for all federal workers who were furloughed during the government shutdown.”


Spending Our Way to Prosperity

Sunday, October 6th, 2013

Focusing on the government shutdown is like rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic while drawing closer to the iceberg.

The iceberg in this case is the massive government debt that will be made worse by the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

Later this month, Congress will need to lift the debt ceiling from its current $16.7 trillion to keep the government solvent and enable the U.S. to continue paying its massive bills.  In the meantime, as a result of the negotiations that led to sequestration, Congress had until the end of September (the end of the fiscal year) to reach a spending agreement.Yield Curve

It didn’t, of course, and now the government has shut down.  But what does the shutdown really mean?

The shutdown affects only “nonessential” services.  That means 85% of government services are still being funded and 63% of federal employees are still working.  Mail is being delivered, military personnel are still keeping us safe, and payments are still being made for Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the countless other programs that we can’t afford.  Amtrak trains will continue running, so if your train is late, don’t blame it on the shutdown.


One Man’s Ceiling Is Another Man’s Floor

Friday, September 27th, 2013

“There’s been some hard feelings here
About some words that were said …
Remember, one man’s ceiling is another man’s floor.”
                                                         Paul Simon

Here we go again. Hold on to your wallets, taxpayers. It’s time for another debt ceiling “negotiation.”

We use the term “negotiation” loosely, as it’s now extinct in Washington.

On one side, we have House Republicans waging an unwinnable battle, saying they’ll agree to suspend the debt ceiling limit for a year in exchange for a one-year delay of the individual mandate for ObamaCare, tax reform, approval of the Keystone pipeline and other concessions. While such changes would potentially provide a huge benefit to the economy, they have zero chance of passing in the Senate, which is controlled by the Democratic majority.Debt ceiling

On the other side, we have President Obama and Senate Democrats saying the Republicans are trying to shut down the federal government, because they are not willing to lift the debt ceiling without concessions from the President.

There will be no concessions by the Democrats. As President Obama put it, “I will not negotiate on anything when it comes to the full faith and credit of the United States of America.”


Sequestration: The Crisis Du Jour

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

It’s crisis time again in Washington, D.C.  Having just barely avoided a swan dive off the fiscal cliff, the leaders of our country are now locked in battle over the pending sequestration.

“Locked” is the operative word here, as the deep freeze that’s hit New England this week is likely to thaw well before the freeze in progress over sequestration.

If nothing else, this standoff has added to our vocabulary.  “Sequestration,” as we’ve learned, is a procedure that triggers automatic spending cuts.  It also means “the seizure of property for creditors,” as in, “China will begin sequestering U.S. property if we can’t control our debt and pay our bills.”  That definition may be more appropriate in years to come, but for now, let’s concentrate on the immediate future.


Fiscal Cliff Turns Into Fiscal Bluff

Friday, January 4th, 2013

“What’s a five letter word for ‘cliff’?“ an editorial page cartoon asked.  The answer: “Bluff.”

To bluff is to mislead and that’s an appropriate summary of the fiscal cliff agreement, which will raise taxes and spending, while failing to consider the country’s growing debt crisis.

The market reacted positively, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average initially up more than 2% and markets in other parts of the world showing similar gains.

The market reaction was not, we suspect, because a well-crafted agreement that benefits America had been negotiated, but because the “fiscal cliff” had been avoided at the last possible second.  Consider what the agreement does – and what it doesn’t do.