Fiscal Cliff Turns Into Fiscal Bluff

“What’s a five letter word for ‘cliff’?“ an editorial page cartoon asked.  The answer: “Bluff.”

To bluff is to mislead and that’s an appropriate summary of the fiscal cliff agreement, which will raise taxes and spending, while failing to consider the country’s growing debt crisis.

The market reacted positively, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average initially up more than 2% and markets in other parts of the world showing similar gains.

The market reaction was not, we suspect, because a well-crafted agreement that benefits America had been negotiated, but because the “fiscal cliff” had been avoided at the last possible second.  Consider what the agreement does – and what it doesn’t do.

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From Goldfinger to Groundhog Day

Tick.  Tick.  Tick.

It’s like that scene in “Goldfinger,” where the seconds are ticking down and James Bond is trying to defuse the bomb.  He succeeds, of course, just in time.

Of course, John Boehner is not James Bond and real life is far more complicated than the movies.

Tick.  Tick.  Tick.

The real problem is not a cliff, but a chasm.  The degree of separation between Democrats and Republicans in Congress has never been wider.

On one side, President Obama and his Democratic supporters are hell-bent on raising taxes on the wealthy, which may not do much to tame the deficit, but may achieve the goal of moving toward class equality.  Democrats believe that more spending is needed to stimulate the economy, even though spending is at an all-time high and the economy is still in dismal shape. read more

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The Black Cloud in the Silver Lining

All I want for Christmas is a new economy.  Ours is broken.

While there are a few positive signs that optimists can latch onto, it appears that either the country will go over the fiscal cliff or virtually no cuts will be made in the $3.8 trillion federal budget.  If nothing else, current spending should prove that Keynesian economics doesn’t work.  With a fourth consecutive deficit exceeding $1 trillion, optimists take as good news a drop in the unemployment rate from 7.9% to 7.7%.  Considering the federal spending that has taken place in recent years, wouldn’t the economy be booming now if Keynesian economics really worked? read more

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So This Is Compromise?

“We are both heading for the cliff.  Who jumps first is the Chicken.”

                                                                                                      – Rebel Without A Cause

Post-election, both Democrats and Republicans have promised to compromise and avoid the fiscal cliff.

So what would you consider a compromise?  A little tax increase, perhaps, along with some spending cuts, then call it a day?  That’s not happening. read more

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Looking Over the Fiscal Cliff

You’ve heard plenty about the fiscal cliff.  But little attention has been paid to what’s beyond it.

What’s beyond it is another higher, steeper cliff.

The federal debt now exceeds $16 trillion and Congress will need to vote shortly to raise the debt ceiling in order to keep the government operating.  We’re running an annual budget deficit exceeding $1 trillion, so the debt will only get higher.

The longer we try to maintain the status quo, the more difficult it will be to bring the debt back in line.  We’re reaching the point where every dollar in the federal budget will be needed just to service our debt.  That means your taxes will no longer go toward building new highways, helping the poor or protecting the United States.  They will be needed to pay off the enormous debt that the President and Congress have incurred. read more

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The Good News: No More Election Ads

In the wake of Tuesday’s re-election of President Obama, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 434 points in two days, a drop of 3.3%.

That’s better than when he was first elected.  After a 305-point rally on Election Day 2008, the DJIA fell 486 points, or more than 5%, on the day after, which was the largest post-election drop ever.

In 2008, the housing bubble had burst and we were dealing with the biggest financial crisis since The Great Depression.  Today, we still have not recovered from the financial crisis, but face a “fiscal cliff” and continuing troubles in Europe. read more

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Pretzel Logic

When Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke said recently that he did not expect The Fed to initiate any additional monetary stimulus, apparently stock traders weren’t listening.

The recent run-up in stock prices was based on conjecture that The Fed would respond to the still-weak economy with major action – perhaps yet another round of quantitative easing.

Instead of announcing quantitative easing, though, the Fed announced the expansion of Operation Twist on Wednesday. Under Operation Twist, which is designed to lower long-term interest rates to stimulate borrowing and investment, the Fed has been selling $400 billion of short-term bonds and using the funds to buy longer-term securities. read more

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