Medicare Is Already Broke

Last week we noted that the Social Security system is going broke. Medicare, though, which provides for the health of America’s seniors is already broke.

With 77 million baby boomers retiring, and a $716 billion reduction in future funding of Medicare thanks to the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), Medicare may be in an even more precarious financial condition than the Social Security system.

Trustees for the Social Security system are also trustees for Medicare and wrote in their recently released annual report that Medicare Part A, which helps pay for hospital care, home-health services following hospital stays, skilled nursing and hospice care for the aged and disabled “fails the test of short-range financial adequacy, as its trust fund ratio is already below 100% of annual costs, and is expected to stay about unchanged to 2021 before declining in a continuous fashion until reserve depletion in 2029.”

Medicare Part B, which pays for physician, outpatient hospital, home health and other services, and Part D, which subsidizes drug coverage, are financed from premiums and general revenues, so they are currently adequately funded, but their costs are expected to rise steadily. So higher taxes and higher premiums will be needed to support them.

The federal government spent $595 billion on Medicare, in the 2016 fiscal year, but adding on the cost of premiums and other funds collected brings the total cost to $699 billion.

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Social Insecurity: Another Reason We’re Going Broke

Except for recent contributions, all of the money that you’ve contributed to the Social Security system throughout your lifetime has already been spent.

That’s because Social Security is a pay-as-you-go system. Contributions from people working today go to people who are retired today. Your contributions will be long gone by the time you retire.

And, depending on your age and whether the folks in Washington can get their act together, there may not be enough money available for you to cash in when you retire.

Going Broke

While the Social Security system currently is solvent, trustees of the Social Security system’s two funds, which support retired and disabled workers, project in their recently released annual report that the funds will be depleted in 2034. As trustees of the programs noted, the funds “fail the test of long-range close actuarial balance.”

Trustees project that annual benefits paid out will exceed the Social Security taxes workers and employers pay beginning in 2022.

And the trustees may be overly optimistic. The Congressional Budget Office, which tends to make rosy predictions about government programs, estimates that the funds will be depleted by 2030. After that, the amount Social Security pays out every year will exceed what it takes in by more than $400 billion.

“Current benefits for retirees already exceed the system’s payroll-tax receipts,” Martin Feldstein wrote in The Wall Street Journal. “Benefits are therefore payable under current law only by drawing on the so-called trust fund, an accounting record of previous Social Security surpluses.”

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Happy Dependence Day

On the fourth of July, we celebrate our freedom from tyranny. Yet King George would be envious of the control the U.S. government, and state and local governments hold over American citizens today.

Our freedom is eroding and, unless major changes are made, someday it will be gone.  If America is the “land of the free,” why are college campuses and media increasingly accepting only “progressive” viewpoints?  Diversity is a great thing, but it should go beyond race and gender to include differing points of view.SR-fed-spending-numbers-2012-p8-1-chart-8_HIGHRES

President Obama has said that he is not a king, but he has acted like one, signing a seemingly endless stream of executive orders. New laws are no longer passed by Congress, but are created by executive order (environmental regulations, dropping restrictions on Cuba) or by one-party vote (the Affordable Care Act, Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act).

And, increasingly, Americans are trading their independence for government dependence.

Consider some of the ways in which we are losing our freedom.

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Wages Will Increase When Productivity Does

There are three things we can say about income with a degree of certainty:

  1. You’re earning less than you did before the financial crisis.
  2. You are overdue for a raise.
  3. You are unlikely to get a raise anytime soon.

If these three statements fit your personal circumstances, you can take some consolation in knowing that you are not alone and that there is likely not much you can do about it.  Using the financial crisis that began in 2007 as a baseline, the Economic Policy Institute found that wages have dropped by an average of up to 5.9%, depending on the category of worker to which you belong. Employees with advanced degrees are the only group that didn’t see its income drop, but that group didn’t see its income rise, either. declining-wages

While the rate of inflation has been low throughout that period, it is still eroding your purchasing power and affecting your standard of living.

Why is income lower today than it was in 2007?

Lower Profits.  A major reason you’re earning less—and why you’re unlikely to get a raise anytime soon—is that your employer is earning less.

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